Title

What You See is Not Always the Truth: Effect of Music on Visual Perception

Poster Number

18B

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Freshman

Additional Authors

In our experiment, we conducted a systematic replication of Prinz & Seidel (2012). Through the utilization of music, we examined whether the visual system could easily be influenced by other perceptual systems. Thirty students at the University of the Pacific saw ambiguous figures as either happy or threatening, depending on the condition they were placed in. We had two experimental groups, the happy and fearful condition, along with a control group (no music). Those placed in the happy condition listened to Grieg’s Morning Wood (1875/1993), while those in the fearful condition listened to Krzysztof Penderecki’s Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima (2012/1960). To account for confounding variables, we issued a pre-assessment that measured the stress of each participant. Similar to Prinz & Seidel (2012), participants were shown the 3 ambiguous figures, along with the two different types of music to be played in the background. Data collection is ongoing. Data will be analyzed using a One-way ANOVA statistical test. along with several graphs, that mirrors the previous study. All in all, we can expect to find evidence that suggests that the modularity of the visual system is weak and therefore can be easily influenced.

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Zsolt Palatinus

Faculty Mentor Email

zpalatinus@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Leah Ward

Abstract/Artist Statement

In our experiment, we conducted a systematic replication of Prinz & Seidel (2012). Through the utilization of music, we examined whether the visual system could easily be influenced by other perceptual systems. Thirty students at the University of the Pacific saw ambiguous figures as either happy or threatening, depending on the condition they were placed in. We had two experimental groups, the happy and fearful condition, along with a control group (no music). Those placed in the happy condition listened to Grieg’s Morning Wood (1875/1993), while those in the fearful condition listened to Krzysztof Penderecki’s Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima (2012/1960). To account for confounding variables, we issued a pre-assessment that measured the stress of each participant. Similar to Prinz & Seidel (2012), participants were shown the 3 ambiguous figures, along with the two different types of music to be played in the background. Data collection is ongoing. Data will be analyzed using a One-way ANOVA statistical test. along with several graphs, that mirrors the previous study. All in all, we can expect to find evidence that suggests that the modularity of the visual system is weak and therefore can be easily influenced.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

What You See is Not Always the Truth: Effect of Music on Visual Perception

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

In our experiment, we conducted a systematic replication of Prinz & Seidel (2012). Through the utilization of music, we examined whether the visual system could easily be influenced by other perceptual systems. Thirty students at the University of the Pacific saw ambiguous figures as either happy or threatening, depending on the condition they were placed in. We had two experimental groups, the happy and fearful condition, along with a control group (no music). Those placed in the happy condition listened to Grieg’s Morning Wood (1875/1993), while those in the fearful condition listened to Krzysztof Penderecki’s Threnody to the Victims of Hiroshima (2012/1960). To account for confounding variables, we issued a pre-assessment that measured the stress of each participant. Similar to Prinz & Seidel (2012), participants were shown the 3 ambiguous figures, along with the two different types of music to be played in the background. Data collection is ongoing. Data will be analyzed using a One-way ANOVA statistical test. along with several graphs, that mirrors the previous study. All in all, we can expect to find evidence that suggests that the modularity of the visual system is weak and therefore can be easily influenced.