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Date of Award

1969

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.)

Department

Biological Sciences

First Advisor

J. David Carson

First Committee Member

Lee Christianson

Second Committee Member

M. Dale Arvey

Abstract

A possible interrelationship between serum cholesterol level and atherosclerosis has long interested investigators in the fields of physiology and biochemistry. Cholesterol is found in very high concentrations in the plaques that occlude coronary arteries in man and laboratory animals. It is generally agreed that hypercholesterolemia favors the appearance of atherosclerotic lesions.1<1

In recent years, much information has been accumulated regarding the factors which affect the serum cholesterol level. Exact and detailed biochemical mechanisms are still not clearly understood. However, it has been demonstrated that the serum cholesterol levels of man and several experimental animals can be lowered significantly by various dietary regimens and drug administrations.2,3,4,5 One antihypercholesteremic agent that has aroused considerable interest is the sitosterol group.

The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of sitosterols from soya bean oil powder on the serum cholesterol levels and to evaluate that effect on the genetic differences two strains of laboratory mice. These two strains of mice, produced previously by selective breeding, differ from each other in their serum cholesterol concentrations.

Pages

43

Included in

Biology Commons

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