Title

Emotion Displays in Race-Specific Animated Film Media and Viewer Perceptions of These Emotions

Poster Number

3

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Melissa Cervantes

Second Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Jessica Grady

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Katherine Brock

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

People learn about emotions through media and come to prefer the emotions they see in media. Therefore, it is important to understand what emotion messages are provided in media, and whether messages vary by race and ethnicity. The current study examined emotion displays in race-specific animated film media in two studies. In Study 1, we addressed the question: Do animated film media characters of different racial and ethnic groups portray different emotions? Twenty films were identified, with five films from each racial group (Asian, Hispanic/Latino, White, and Black). We scored each scene for the presence and intensity of discrete emotions, such as positive emotions (happy, love, curiosity, and surprise), negative powerful emotions (anger and dislike), negative powerless emotions (sad, fear, and worry), and focus. Between the racial groups, Hispanic/Latino characters displayed more happiness/curiosity, Black and White characters displayed more dislike/anger, and Asian and White characters displayed more focus. In Study 2, we addressed the questions: How are emotion-related messages received? Can viewers relate to modeled emotions, and do they mirror these emotions? Participants watched nine clips through a Zoom video call: a sample clip, and a positive emotion clip and a negative emotion clip from each race. Following each clip, participants self-reported their emotions and reported the emotions of the characters. After data collection, research assistants coded for participant affect. Generally, participants’ mean intensity for character report and self-report were similar for the positive emotions and different for the negative emotions. There was little variation for affect scores; participants generally did not show any emotions. Implications are that racial variations in emotion portrayals are important because people learn about emotions through media, therefore understanding differences in emotion portrayals may have implications for regulating emotions and better understanding oneself.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 1:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 2:15 PM

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Apr 24th, 1:00 PM Apr 24th, 2:15 PM

Emotion Displays in Race-Specific Animated Film Media and Viewer Perceptions of These Emotions

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

People learn about emotions through media and come to prefer the emotions they see in media. Therefore, it is important to understand what emotion messages are provided in media, and whether messages vary by race and ethnicity. The current study examined emotion displays in race-specific animated film media in two studies. In Study 1, we addressed the question: Do animated film media characters of different racial and ethnic groups portray different emotions? Twenty films were identified, with five films from each racial group (Asian, Hispanic/Latino, White, and Black). We scored each scene for the presence and intensity of discrete emotions, such as positive emotions (happy, love, curiosity, and surprise), negative powerful emotions (anger and dislike), negative powerless emotions (sad, fear, and worry), and focus. Between the racial groups, Hispanic/Latino characters displayed more happiness/curiosity, Black and White characters displayed more dislike/anger, and Asian and White characters displayed more focus. In Study 2, we addressed the questions: How are emotion-related messages received? Can viewers relate to modeled emotions, and do they mirror these emotions? Participants watched nine clips through a Zoom video call: a sample clip, and a positive emotion clip and a negative emotion clip from each race. Following each clip, participants self-reported their emotions and reported the emotions of the characters. After data collection, research assistants coded for participant affect. Generally, participants’ mean intensity for character report and self-report were similar for the positive emotions and different for the negative emotions. There was little variation for affect scores; participants generally did not show any emotions. Implications are that racial variations in emotion portrayals are important because people learn about emotions through media, therefore understanding differences in emotion portrayals may have implications for regulating emotions and better understanding oneself.