Title

Interning at the Martin Gipson Socialization Center: Promoting Reintegration and Mental Wellness

Poster Number

17B

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Matthew Normand

Faculty Mentor Email

mnormand@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Todd Fabian

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

tfabian@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Department of Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

The Martin Gipson Socialization Center is part of Stockton’s Community Re-Entry Program, a behavioral-based program that is funded through county and other state funding sources. It is a drop-in facility that provides services for adults with a mental illness diagnosis. Services include small, subject-based courses, in which consumers learn various independent living skills. In addition, the center provides leisure time usage, part-time employment jobs, referral needs, and other opportunities that promote wellness in patients’ daily functioning. Through these various services, individuals learn to reintegrate into the community and maintain their overall quality of life.

As the student intern, my responsibilities were to develop rapport with consumers in various recreational activities, teach health and wellness classes to small groups, and write progress notes for billable patients. A typical day’s activities involved engaging with individuals in billiards, dominoes, karaoke, etc. I would also work individually with consumers in promoting their social skills.

The classes were based on a topic’s skill area decided upon by the program. Topics I taught included medication education, social skills, and anger management. Depending on the specific skill area, I had the option to give consumers worksheets, make the class discussion-based, or both. After, I would write the necessary progress notes for each billable patient. Here, their progress was measured on three criteria: 1) percentage of correct or appropriate responses on a given lesson, 2) the number of times consumers disrupted the class, and 3) the numbers of times they needed to be prompted to answer discussion questions.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Interning at the Martin Gipson Socialization Center: Promoting Reintegration and Mental Wellness

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

The Martin Gipson Socialization Center is part of Stockton’s Community Re-Entry Program, a behavioral-based program that is funded through county and other state funding sources. It is a drop-in facility that provides services for adults with a mental illness diagnosis. Services include small, subject-based courses, in which consumers learn various independent living skills. In addition, the center provides leisure time usage, part-time employment jobs, referral needs, and other opportunities that promote wellness in patients’ daily functioning. Through these various services, individuals learn to reintegrate into the community and maintain their overall quality of life.

As the student intern, my responsibilities were to develop rapport with consumers in various recreational activities, teach health and wellness classes to small groups, and write progress notes for billable patients. A typical day’s activities involved engaging with individuals in billiards, dominoes, karaoke, etc. I would also work individually with consumers in promoting their social skills.

The classes were based on a topic’s skill area decided upon by the program. Topics I taught included medication education, social skills, and anger management. Depending on the specific skill area, I had the option to give consumers worksheets, make the class discussion-based, or both. After, I would write the necessary progress notes for each billable patient. Here, their progress was measured on three criteria: 1) percentage of correct or appropriate responses on a given lesson, 2) the number of times consumers disrupted the class, and 3) the numbers of times they needed to be prompted to answer discussion questions.