Title

In De-Nile of Our Mummy Issues: Memory Under Wraps

Poster Number

22B

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Psychology

Second Author Status

Junior

Third Author Major

Psychology

Third Author Status

Junior

Fourth Author Major

Psychology

Fourth Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Zsolt Palatinus

Faculty Mentor Email

zpalatinus@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Leah Ward

Abstract/Artist Statement

Previous research has found a difference in memory recall between different forms of information delivery (Murray & Thomson, 2011; Heikkilä & Tiippana, 2015), finding that visual methods of information delivery yield higher amounts of memory recall than audio methods of information delivery. The purpose of the present study is to look into differences in memory recall between different forms of information delivery. We hypothesized in a preliminary study that participants in the visual group, those receiving written text, would achieve significantly higher scores than participants in the audio group, those hearing the information. Thirty students from University of the Pacific were given a story and then tested on their memory recall of key details. The participants were recruited via SONA and the studies were conducted in the Psychology building. A story with an audio format and the same story in visual format were presented to two separate groups. Participants were given the same memory related test. We conducted an independent samples t test for results. It was found that the visual group performed significantly higher than the audio group. In the next phase of our study, we will add a third condition which will utilize both audio and visual methods (video), to find differences in memory recall between all three groups. We hypothesize that participants in the video group will perform higher than participants in the other conditions. In the next phase of our study, we will be recruiting 30 students via SONA to participate. This experiment will also take place in the Psychology building. Data collection is ongoing. We will conduct an independent samples t test as well as a one-way ANOVA on the data collected. Upon viewing our poster, the audience can expect to examine graphs that detail the results, limitations, as well as a discussion of the findings.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

In De-Nile of Our Mummy Issues: Memory Under Wraps

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Previous research has found a difference in memory recall between different forms of information delivery (Murray & Thomson, 2011; Heikkilä & Tiippana, 2015), finding that visual methods of information delivery yield higher amounts of memory recall than audio methods of information delivery. The purpose of the present study is to look into differences in memory recall between different forms of information delivery. We hypothesized in a preliminary study that participants in the visual group, those receiving written text, would achieve significantly higher scores than participants in the audio group, those hearing the information. Thirty students from University of the Pacific were given a story and then tested on their memory recall of key details. The participants were recruited via SONA and the studies were conducted in the Psychology building. A story with an audio format and the same story in visual format were presented to two separate groups. Participants were given the same memory related test. We conducted an independent samples t test for results. It was found that the visual group performed significantly higher than the audio group. In the next phase of our study, we will add a third condition which will utilize both audio and visual methods (video), to find differences in memory recall between all three groups. We hypothesize that participants in the video group will perform higher than participants in the other conditions. In the next phase of our study, we will be recruiting 30 students via SONA to participate. This experiment will also take place in the Psychology building. Data collection is ongoing. We will conduct an independent samples t test as well as a one-way ANOVA on the data collected. Upon viewing our poster, the audience can expect to examine graphs that detail the results, limitations, as well as a discussion of the findings.