Title

Oviposition in túngara frogs

Poster Number

07B

Lead Author Major

Biology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Biology

Second Author Status

Junior

Third Author Major

Biology

Third Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcos Gridi-Papp

Faculty Mentor Email

mgridipapp@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Physical stimulation by the male is currently regarded as a necessary trigger in order for oviposition to occur. Our preliminary experiments with túngara frogs have indicated otherwise, as females laid eggs without the presence of a male. In order to identify other contributing stimuli, we tested the relative importance of male presence, water, advertisement calls, and call complexity. We used a captive colony of túngara frogs. For each trial, we placed 12 females into individual sound-proof breeding chambers. In a series of experiments, they were exposed to: 1) the whine call or the whine-chuck call 2) male or male call 3) water or wet moss. Each trial lasted 48 h after which the females that did not lay eggs were exposed to the full stimulus (male + calls + water) for an additional 48 h. Throughout the 72 h trials, the females not utilized were housed with moss and males but no water. The oviposition rate with acoustic stimulation by the whine-only call was 35.4%, whereas for whine-chuck calls it was 23.2%. Females oviposited 42.3% of the times when there was a male present and 29.8% of the females oviposited with just male call recordings. The oviposition rate in the presence of both call and water was 18.5% while for call and wet moss it was 3.5%. Without water or sound, amplexus was rare and oviposition did not occur. With sound only, 30-60% of the males amplected a female but no eggs were laid. The 3 stimuli, water, sound, and males, do not need to be present simultaneously in order for oviposition to occur. Instead, only water coupled with either a call or the presence of a male is required for the female to lay eggs. Having all three stimuli increases the probability of oviposition occurring.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Oviposition in túngara frogs

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Physical stimulation by the male is currently regarded as a necessary trigger in order for oviposition to occur. Our preliminary experiments with túngara frogs have indicated otherwise, as females laid eggs without the presence of a male. In order to identify other contributing stimuli, we tested the relative importance of male presence, water, advertisement calls, and call complexity. We used a captive colony of túngara frogs. For each trial, we placed 12 females into individual sound-proof breeding chambers. In a series of experiments, they were exposed to: 1) the whine call or the whine-chuck call 2) male or male call 3) water or wet moss. Each trial lasted 48 h after which the females that did not lay eggs were exposed to the full stimulus (male + calls + water) for an additional 48 h. Throughout the 72 h trials, the females not utilized were housed with moss and males but no water. The oviposition rate with acoustic stimulation by the whine-only call was 35.4%, whereas for whine-chuck calls it was 23.2%. Females oviposited 42.3% of the times when there was a male present and 29.8% of the females oviposited with just male call recordings. The oviposition rate in the presence of both call and water was 18.5% while for call and wet moss it was 3.5%. Without water or sound, amplexus was rare and oviposition did not occur. With sound only, 30-60% of the males amplected a female but no eggs were laid. The 3 stimuli, water, sound, and males, do not need to be present simultaneously in order for oviposition to occur. Instead, only water coupled with either a call or the presence of a male is required for the female to lay eggs. Having all three stimuli increases the probability of oviposition occurring.