Title

Drinking Water Security and Sustainability

Poster Number

18

Lead Author Major

Civil Engineering

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Mary Kay Camarillo

Faculty Mentor Department

Civil Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

A series of presidential decision directives (PDD) and legislation have strengthened the U.S. stance on water security issues. Much of this effort has been in response to the events of September 11, 2001. However, even before this egregious event, security was a significant concern for U.S. politicians. Legislation that affected water security directly began with Executive Order 13010 in 1996 which contained the President’s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (PCCIP) that listed water supply as one of the eight national infrastructures vital to security. Steps need to be taken to strengthen water security and protect American drinking water. Most importantly, better technology is needed to detect and aid in responding to security breaches or contamination events. Much of the existing work in the area of contaminant warning systems has been theoretical, based on computer modeling and simulation. Field-testing of available devices and systems is needed to verify performance and provide baseline monitoring information. Additional physical security systems are needed throughout the country for large and small water systems. Detection of intentional or accidental contaminants is crucial to ensuring the protection the drinking water quality. Improved methods of detection will allow for quicker responses and for a contamination event to have a less severe impact. Detection technologies are being developed to improve the water quality monitoring equipment and tools available in a water security contamination event.

Location

Grave Covell

Start Date

21-4-2012 10:00 AM

End Date

21-4-2012 12:00 PM

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Apr 21st, 10:00 AM Apr 21st, 12:00 PM

Drinking Water Security and Sustainability

Grave Covell

A series of presidential decision directives (PDD) and legislation have strengthened the U.S. stance on water security issues. Much of this effort has been in response to the events of September 11, 2001. However, even before this egregious event, security was a significant concern for U.S. politicians. Legislation that affected water security directly began with Executive Order 13010 in 1996 which contained the President’s Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection (PCCIP) that listed water supply as one of the eight national infrastructures vital to security. Steps need to be taken to strengthen water security and protect American drinking water. Most importantly, better technology is needed to detect and aid in responding to security breaches or contamination events. Much of the existing work in the area of contaminant warning systems has been theoretical, based on computer modeling and simulation. Field-testing of available devices and systems is needed to verify performance and provide baseline monitoring information. Additional physical security systems are needed throughout the country for large and small water systems. Detection of intentional or accidental contaminants is crucial to ensuring the protection the drinking water quality. Improved methods of detection will allow for quicker responses and for a contamination event to have a less severe impact. Detection technologies are being developed to improve the water quality monitoring equipment and tools available in a water security contamination event.