Title

Chloroquinolyl Analogues as Potential Treatments for Trichomonas vaginalis

Poster Number

23

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Trichomonas vaginalis is a facultative anaerobic protozoan that causes Trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted disease in humans. Currently metronidazole is the only FDA-approved antibiotic for Trichomoniasis. To counter the emergence of metronidazole resistant strains of T. vaginalis, there is a need to find alternative drug treatments. Compound susceptibility assays were conducted on the T1 strain of T. vaginalis using seven chloroquinolyl analogues that were previously evaluated against Plasmodium falciparum. All seven compounds inhibited growth of T. vaginalis at the highest concentration tested (10 uM). Of the seven compounds, A-125, A-139, A-126, A-127 were the most effective at inhibiting T.vaginalis growth, having IC50 concentrations ranging from 2.2-2.5uM. A-132 and A-131 were less effective with IC50 concentrations of 3.059uM and 3.475uM respectively. A-120 was the least effective inhibitor with an IC50 concentration of 5.293uM. Further testing is necessary to determine structure-activity relationships.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Start Date

2-5-2009 1:00 PM

End Date

2-5-2009 3:00 PM

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May 2nd, 1:00 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Chloroquinolyl Analogues as Potential Treatments for Trichomonas vaginalis

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Trichomonas vaginalis is a facultative anaerobic protozoan that causes Trichomoniasis, a sexually transmitted disease in humans. Currently metronidazole is the only FDA-approved antibiotic for Trichomoniasis. To counter the emergence of metronidazole resistant strains of T. vaginalis, there is a need to find alternative drug treatments. Compound susceptibility assays were conducted on the T1 strain of T. vaginalis using seven chloroquinolyl analogues that were previously evaluated against Plasmodium falciparum. All seven compounds inhibited growth of T. vaginalis at the highest concentration tested (10 uM). Of the seven compounds, A-125, A-139, A-126, A-127 were the most effective at inhibiting T.vaginalis growth, having IC50 concentrations ranging from 2.2-2.5uM. A-132 and A-131 were less effective with IC50 concentrations of 3.059uM and 3.475uM respectively. A-120 was the least effective inhibitor with an IC50 concentration of 5.293uM. Further testing is necessary to determine structure-activity relationships.