Title

Testing the Effectiveness of the High-Probability Instruction Sequence

Poster Number

9

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

Compliance to instructions is a necessary component of skill acquisition procedures and learning. Although such techniques as physical prompting and time-out are used to increase compliance and decrease noncompliance, indirect methods may be favorable over direct, to reduce problem behaviors that may occur as a result of physical interaction. The high-probability instruction sequence is a procedure designed to help increase compliance without physical contact. It is based on the concept of behavioral momentum, where compliance to a series of high-probability (high-p) commands (i.e., a command that is complied with at least 90% of the time it is given) immediately prior to a low-probability (low-p) command (i.e., a command that is complied with at most 10% of the time it is given) increases the probability of compliance to the low-p command. Previous research has tested the effectiveness of the high-p instruction sequence by manipulating antecedents and stimuli present during the sequence (Bullock & Normand, 2006; Kestner, Normand, & Jessel, 2008). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the high-p instruction sequence on compliance. It was hypothesized that if deterioration of compliance to high-p instructions occurred, changes in compliance would occur when stimuli present during the sequence were manipulated. Compliance to high-p instructions during the sequence did not deteriorate, but did show to increase compliance to low-p instructions. These results are similar to current literature that has also shown the effectiveness of the high-p instruction sequence on increasing compliance to low-p instructions (Bullock & Normand, 2006; Mace et al., 1988; Patel et al., 2007; Wilder et al., 2007).

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Start Date

2-5-2009 1:00 PM

End Date

2-5-2009 3:00 PM

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May 2nd, 1:00 PM May 2nd, 3:00 PM

Testing the Effectiveness of the High-Probability Instruction Sequence

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom B

Compliance to instructions is a necessary component of skill acquisition procedures and learning. Although such techniques as physical prompting and time-out are used to increase compliance and decrease noncompliance, indirect methods may be favorable over direct, to reduce problem behaviors that may occur as a result of physical interaction. The high-probability instruction sequence is a procedure designed to help increase compliance without physical contact. It is based on the concept of behavioral momentum, where compliance to a series of high-probability (high-p) commands (i.e., a command that is complied with at least 90% of the time it is given) immediately prior to a low-probability (low-p) command (i.e., a command that is complied with at most 10% of the time it is given) increases the probability of compliance to the low-p command. Previous research has tested the effectiveness of the high-p instruction sequence by manipulating antecedents and stimuli present during the sequence (Bullock & Normand, 2006; Kestner, Normand, & Jessel, 2008). The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the high-p instruction sequence on compliance. It was hypothesized that if deterioration of compliance to high-p instructions occurred, changes in compliance would occur when stimuli present during the sequence were manipulated. Compliance to high-p instructions during the sequence did not deteriorate, but did show to increase compliance to low-p instructions. These results are similar to current literature that has also shown the effectiveness of the high-p instruction sequence on increasing compliance to low-p instructions (Bullock & Normand, 2006; Mace et al., 1988; Patel et al., 2007; Wilder et al., 2007).