Title

Media use: then and now.

Poster Number

29

Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Artist Statement

A sample of 700 college students tested the correlation between students having a favorite television cartoon they watched everyday as a child, and watching televisions to be better informed. We also tested the correlation between students' interests in watching old episodes of their favorite childhood cartoons, and their spending habits on entertainment. We collected responses from college students to test a variety of issues such as media use and self esteem. We tested the students by using a non-probability sampling of the population, mainly through convenience. Each student in our research class took the survey to our most populous class, without overlapping, and surveyed the students in those classes. Additionally, we went to Delta College and surveyed students as well. The data collected from these 700 students allows us to investigate the research question: does a student having a favorite television cartoon show as children, make students more comfortable receiving information through television as adults. Anticipated results are that if a student had a favorite cartoon show as a child that they rarely missed, they will be more inclined to use television as their means of becoming informed. This correlation is based on the hypothesis that the students that had a favorite cartoon show to teach them morals and entertainment in the past are more inclined to use the hypothesis that the more interested a student is in revisiting childhood memories, the more interested they will be on entertainment and preservation of the ideals of childhood; fun and enjoyment.

Location

Pacific Geosciences Center

Start Date

26-4-2003 9:00 AM

End Date

26-4-2003 5:00 PM

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Apr 26th, 9:00 AM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

Media use: then and now.

Pacific Geosciences Center

A sample of 700 college students tested the correlation between students having a favorite television cartoon they watched everyday as a child, and watching televisions to be better informed. We also tested the correlation between students' interests in watching old episodes of their favorite childhood cartoons, and their spending habits on entertainment. We collected responses from college students to test a variety of issues such as media use and self esteem. We tested the students by using a non-probability sampling of the population, mainly through convenience. Each student in our research class took the survey to our most populous class, without overlapping, and surveyed the students in those classes. Additionally, we went to Delta College and surveyed students as well. The data collected from these 700 students allows us to investigate the research question: does a student having a favorite television cartoon show as children, make students more comfortable receiving information through television as adults. Anticipated results are that if a student had a favorite cartoon show as a child that they rarely missed, they will be more inclined to use television as their means of becoming informed. This correlation is based on the hypothesis that the students that had a favorite cartoon show to teach them morals and entertainment in the past are more inclined to use the hypothesis that the more interested a student is in revisiting childhood memories, the more interested they will be on entertainment and preservation of the ideals of childhood; fun and enjoyment.