Lead Author Affiliation

Graduate Endodontics

Lead Author Program & Year

Graduate Endodontics

Presentation Category

Other

Introduction/Context/Diagnosis

• Since the advent of CADCAM (Computer Aided Designing Computer Aided Machining) in the 1960s, 3D printing has been implemented in many industries including the healthcare sectors. The use of 3D printing in reproducing anatomically accurate teaching resources in medicine has been explored and has also been implemented more widely in certain fields of dentistry such as oral surgery and prosthodontics. Within the recent years, it has started to gain more interest and implementation in the field of endodontics as well. • Some of the main hindrances to the widespread adoption of this promising technology pertaining to endodontics could be 1) related to the cost and 2) the learning curve involved in learning the software, and hardware that is used. • Most of the studies published with regards to endodontic applications have involved the use of higher end expensive 3D printers ($100,000 +) and expensive licensed commercial software. • Nowadays, with the advent of newer budget 3D resin printers capable of higher accuracy/resolution and the widespread online availability of free open source software needed for 3D printing, adopting this technology into an endodontic practice is more feasible than before. This is further helped as more and more endodontists install their own CBCT machines/software into their clinics.

Methods/Treatment Plan

Hardware Needed: • 3D Resin Printer- Phrozen Sonic Mini LCD 3D Printer ($300) • Model Bath/Washing Station- (LOCK & LOCK HPL933BT Pickle Container)- $14 • UV Post Curing Station - (UV light strips + stainless steel bread basket + automatic timer + baker’s rack) - $60 • Misc Items for Workflow- (Bottles of Resin for printing, IPA for washing, Nitrile gloves, mask, goggles, metal and plastic scrapers, filters, wire cutters)

Software Needed: • For initial CBCT manipulation: 3DSlicer- Free • To analyze and correct model issues: Autodesk Meshmixer- Free • To optimize orientation of model and generate supports: Prusa Slicer- Free • To slice STL model for printing Chitubox- Free

Workflow From Start to Finish: 1) CBCT Acquisition 2) Import Dicom File into 3DSlicer for Segmentation 3) Import STL File into Meshmixer for Analysis/Repair 4) Import Meshmixer STL File into PrusaSlicer for Orientation/Support Generation 5) Import PrusaSlicer STL File into Chitubox for Slicing 6) 3D Print Model with Phrozen Sonic Mini 7) Wash/Clean Model in Washing Station 8) Post Cure in UV Curing Oven 9) Remove Supports and Final Smoothing/Inspection

Results/Outcome

Clinical Applications: 3D printing a tooth to assess the anatomy and deciding treatment plan; Practicing Access and Negotiating; 3D Replica of Lower Molar; Radix Entomolaris

3D Printing For Surgical Evaluation: ”Virtual” Osteotomy

3D Printing For Pathology Evaluation: Assessing Extent of Periapical Pathology

3D Printing For Patient Education: Maxillary Model Showing Extensive Bone Loss; Apico Surgery Patient Model;

Significance/Conclusions

What Does the Future Hold For 3D Printing at UOP? • This proof of concept serves as a springboard for future residents to further explore avenues to implement this workflow in their treatment of endodontic patients. • As technology improves in the future, hopefully the workflow can be modified and refined to make it more efficient and easy to use.

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3D Printing for Endodontic Applications With a Limited Budget

• Since the advent of CADCAM (Computer Aided Designing Computer Aided Machining) in the 1960s, 3D printing has been implemented in many industries including the healthcare sectors. The use of 3D printing in reproducing anatomically accurate teaching resources in medicine has been explored and has also been implemented more widely in certain fields of dentistry such as oral surgery and prosthodontics. Within the recent years, it has started to gain more interest and implementation in the field of endodontics as well. • Some of the main hindrances to the widespread adoption of this promising technology pertaining to endodontics could be 1) related to the cost and 2) the learning curve involved in learning the software, and hardware that is used. • Most of the studies published with regards to endodontic applications have involved the use of higher end expensive 3D printers ($100,000 +) and expensive licensed commercial software. • Nowadays, with the advent of newer budget 3D resin printers capable of higher accuracy/resolution and the widespread online availability of free open source software needed for 3D printing, adopting this technology into an endodontic practice is more feasible than before. This is further helped as more and more endodontists install their own CBCT machines/software into their clinics.