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Date of Award

1931

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

College of the Pacific

First Advisor

M. Ruth Smith

Abstract

Although there is some difference of opinion today concerning George Sand's position in French literature, it is a definite fact that she was an important literary figure during her lifetime. By important, I do not necessarily mean that she was always popular, for she received a great deal of unfavorable criticism; but her name was famous name, her works were generally the talked-of books, and her influence was feared. "George Sand" attached to a new publication brought immediate interest and heated discussion. Commercial men capitalized on this fact, for we are told that a certain in Rafin named a new perfume after the famous author, and one of two balloons let loose from Paris to establish communication with the provisory government at Bordeaux carried the appellation "George Sand".1

George Sand has, by all means, a claim to high position in the realm of French literature. The ideal, the illusion of life, which she presents, has done a great deal to assure this position, but it is not all. For the first time in the history of the literature of France, the humble peasants took their place in the novel.

Pages

104

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