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Date of Award

2009

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Sport Sciences

First Advisor

Mark Van Ness

First Committee Member

Christopher R. Snell

Second Committee Member

Staci R. Stevens

Abstract

The relationship between dietary intake and the pathology of CFS has been an area of intense speculation without strong research support. There may be important links between diet and symptoms such that dietary interventions may be efficacious as adjunct therapy. This study was designed to assess any dietary abnormalities among Chronic Fatigue Syndrome patients. The purpose of this study is to make a controlled assessment of usual dietary intake so that dietary recommendations for CFS patients can be made. A Diet History Questionnaire, provided by the National Institute of Health, was used to analyze usual dietary intake among CFS patients. Women, ages I 8 and older, diagnosed by a physician with CFS, and were asked to complete the online survey. To complete the questionnaire, participants were provided with a user name and password and asked to answer a number of questions about their dietary habit. Twenty (n=20) women with CFS completed the questionnaire. The results were compiled and analyzed using Diet-Calc software and compared with nonnative data. Several nutrients were found to be deficient in more than 75% of the CFS patients.

Pages

75

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