Date of Award

1982

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Martin T. Gipson

First Committee Member

Esther A. Cohen

Second Committee Member

Gary N. Howell

Abstract

Heterosocial cognitions, skill, and anxiety were identified as constructs which are components of heterosocial performance. Each of these constructs was defined, and Likert-scale items intended to reflect these definitions were generated. The possibility that these constructs differed for men and women was tested both consensually and statistically. Judges determined the suitability of of each item for each sex, as well as the appropriateness of each item for each construct. Items judged as belonging to the three constructs were assigned to three separate subscales of a self-report measure. The construct validity and reliability of each subscale were determined through, three administrations of the measure to groups of approximately 300 people each. Data from the first administration used to verify what items might be gender specific and two versions of the subscales were generated from the results, one for men and one for women. Additionally, normative data were derived for men and women from the sample of people surveyed. The study was successful in the initial development and validation of two self-report instruments, one for each sex, for concurrently assessing heterosocial cognitions, skill, and anxiety with coefficient alpha ranging from .86 to .90 in the final iteration. The normative data indicated that there are few sex differences in responses to items in each of the three subscales.

Pages

280

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