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Date of Award

1972

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.)

Department

Pharmacy

First Advisor

James C. King

First Committee Member

Herschel Frye

Second Committee Member

D. Y. Barker

Abstract

The specific purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of pH on the stability of ampicillin sodium for injection. Then, to correlate this information, a pH profile may be established to predict chemical stability with ampicillin sodium alone or when other drugs may be included in the admixture. With a pH profile the pharmacist could predict the length of time after which more than a 10 percent loss of activity would occur. Stability measurements were to be accomplished through a microbiological assay after adding ampicillin sodium to different buffer solutions. At the end of four hours, eight hours, and twelve hours, a quantitative determination was made to indicate to amount of ampicillin that is lost through chemical degradation.

The second purpose of this study was to test the validity of a spectrophotometric analysis of ampicillin, employing ultraviolet spectrophotometry to determine degradation of ampicillin at specific pH’s. All attempts were made to stimulate a clinical situation by adjusting the concentration, temperature, and illumination to the typical hospital environment.

Pages

82

COinS
 

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