Campus Access Only

All rights reserved. This publication is intended for use solely by faculty, students, and staff of University of the Pacific. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, now known or later developed, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author or the publisher.

Date of Award

1986

Document Type

Dissertation - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Graduate Studies

First Advisor

Dennis C. Brennan

First Committee Member

Roy J. Timmons

Second Committee Member

John V. Schippers

Third Committee Member

Roger L. Reimer

Fourth Committee Member

Betty Pacheco

Fifth Committee Member

B. MacMillan

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to gather and apply statistical treatments to measure the perceptions of California continuation high school principals relative to the effectiveness of various non-classroom actions in combating student truancy. This study was designed to develop a prioritized listing of non-classroom actions in combating student truancy and to determine if significant differences existed in perceptions of California continuation high school principals based upon respondents' school size as determined by the number of certificated staff members, sex, years of employment in education, years of experience in California continuation education, and years of employment as a California continuation high school principal.

One hundred eighty six California continuation high school principals were randomly selected to participate in the study. One hundred forty six research questionnaires were returned, which equates to a 78 percent sample return.

To determine the relative importance of the various non-classroom actions in combating student truancy a mean score was determined for each item comprising the research questionnaire. The actions were then ranked in order of perceived importance. On a 5 point Likert rating scale four actions received a mean score of at least 4.00, thirteen received a mean score between 3.99 and 3.00, six received a mean score between 2.99 and 2.00, and two received a mean score below 1.99. An analysis of variance was utilized to determine if statistically significant differences existed at the .05 level among groups based upon respondents' school size, sex, years of employment in education, years of experience in California continuation education, and years of employment as a California continuation high school principal. Fisher's Least Significant Difference Multiple Comparison Procedure was utilized to determine where differences existed. One significant difference was detected based upon school size, five significant differences were detected based upon years of employment as a California continuation high school principal, and six significant differences were detected based upon sex. No significant differences were detected based upon years of employment in education or years of experience in California continuation education. Recommendations for use, based upon item mean score and percentage of field experiential use, are made.

Pages

188

To access this thesis/dissertation you must have a valid pacific.edu email address and log-in to Scholarly Commons.

Find in ProQuest

Share

COinS

If you are the author and would like to grant permission to make your work openly accessible, please email