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Date of Award

1990

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Martin T. Gipson

First Committee Member

Kenneth L. Beauchamp

Second Committee Member

Carter Brown

Third Committee Member

Steve Wheeler

Fourth Committee Member

Verna Willis

Abstract

The evaluation of commercial training was examined through the study of a specific training program for bankers. Two functional groups within a 20 billion dollar U.S. bank participated in the study and both were split into experimental (trained) and control (untrained) groups.

Four levels of evaluation were implemented in this study; they include: (1) trainee opinions about the training, (2) change in trainee behavior during training, (3) changes in trainee on-the-job behavior. and (4) organizational results or bottom-line measurements. Some measurements used existing performance tracking programs within the bank, while others were developed by the experimenter and implemented by bank personnel.

For Levels 1 through 3, the trend of the results is in the direction of improved selling knowledge and performance, but the changes are modest. Level 4 results. on the other hand, show a significant increase in performance among the trained group when compared to the untrained group. Evaluation studies using the four-level method are feasible to conduct in banking environments and most procedures used in this study can and should be replicated in other environments.

Pages

143

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