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Date of Award

1992

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Martin T. Gipson

First Committee Member

Gary N. Howells

Second Committee Member

Roger G. Katz

Abstract

Current Type A research emphasizes cognitive variables which may predispose negative emotions, maladaptive behavioral coping, autonomic arousal, and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Hostility and the Type A belief style delineated by Price exemplify pervasive, cross-situational cognitive styles. Hostile cognitions (e.g., "Someone has it in for me") reflect cynicism and distrust. Price's construct is somewhat similar: (a) External achievements define self-worth, (b) no universal moral principles exist (i.e., "Nice guys finish last"), and (c) all resources are scarce (i.e., "Your loss is my gain").

Using male college basketball coaches as practice partners, I attempted to answer two primary questions with the present study. First, are Type A beliefs, hostility, perceived stress, and the experience and expression of anger related in basketball coaches? Second, is there a relationship between the experience and expression of anger (self-reported and observed) and the self-reported risk of cardiovascular disease in basketball coaches?

Pages

83

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