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Date of Award

1968

Document Type

Dissertation - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Graduate School

Abstract

It was the purpose of this study to analyze the status and role of student activities to propose the scope and duties of the position, and to establish criteria for qualifications, selection, and appointment of these co-administrators in California public high schools. Initially, a survey was made of all California public high schools to determine if there was a sufficient number of these co-administrators assigned on at least a half-time basis to warrant a more detailed study. The results not only indicated a more detailed study was warranted, but that this was the administrative pattern in the majority of schools whose principals participated in the survey. One hundred high schools were selected from those whose principals had indicated in the survey that their schools would participate in a more detailed study. Through the use of a questionnaire, both principals and student activities administrators in the selected schools were requested to report on current practice in their schools and to make value judgments that could be used as a basis for establishing recommended practice. The conclusions of the study included the following: (1) the position is an emerging professional assignment, which as yet, has not been adequately defined, (2) the duties reported as current practice indicate that most of the student activities administrators arc responsible, basically, for the same duties and responsibilities, (3) the two titles most commonly used for the position, vice principal (or assistant principal) and director of activities, do not appear to be adequate or appropriate; the former is not descriptive and the latter is inappropriate under California law, (4) principals and student activities administrators showed a great amount of agreement as to what should be desirable qualifications for a staff member assigned to the position, and what duties he should perform, and (5) recommendations from these two groups indicate areas of agreement that may be considered broad guidelines for establishing qualifications, training, and job responsibilities for the position.

Pages

149

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