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Date of Award

1968

Document Type

Dissertation - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

Department

Chemistry

First Advisor

Paul H. Gross

First Committee Member

Charles A. Matuszak

Second Committee Member

Richard P. Dodge

Third Committee Member

Richard L. Perry

Fourth Committee Member

Howard K. Zimmerman

Abstract

The measurement of viscosity is a common and useful technique for investigating the mechanical behavior of many real fluids. Theoretical interpretations of viscosity measurements have been important in attempts to elucidate fundamental properties of the liquid state. Brush (6) and Bondi (3) give reviews of the current status of attempts to construct theories of liquid viscosity, and it is quite apparent from these reviews that the molecular theory of rheological phenomena is in its infancy.

In addition to the fundamental aspects of viscometry, there are many practical applications to which viscosity measurements are directed (25). One has only to scan the contents of the series edited by Eirich (10) to gain an appreciation of the voluminous aspects of practical rheology. Among the rheological topics discussed in the Eirich series are the spinning of synthetic fibers, lubrication and lubricants, extrusion molding, and biological fluid transport. Most of the articles in applied rheology are concerned with commercially available instruments for measurement of viscosity and flow and the general phenomenological theory for flow with emphasis on non- Newtonian flow.

Pages

139

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