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Date of Award

1991

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Roseann Hannon

First Committee Member

Douglas Matheson

Second Committee Member

Gary Howells

Abstract

This study investigated the effectiveness of psychosocial treatment in reducing stress, improving mood and enhancing immune functioning in gay males diagnosed HIV seropositive. A J & J I-30 Biofeedback System monitored muscle potential, respiration, heart rate, electrodermal response and temperature during sessions where participants received training and/or were subject to a stress profile. Home practice tapes were provided. Results showed a delayed treatment effect in reducing stress and symptom severity and improving mood for two participants. One participant showed improvement in hardiness. Stress Profile results showed decreases in muscle potential during stress for three participants. All participants improved during recovery. During EMG biofeedback sessions, two participants improved. Within sessions, immune functioning improved for three participants. Overall, results suggest that participants learned skills that enabled them to better adapt to stress, and access, perhaps through a change in consciousness, some mechanism through which immune functioning improved in the short term. (Abstract shortened with permission of author.)

Pages

178

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