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Date of Award

1995

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Roger Katz

First Committee Member

Kenneth L. Beauchamp

Second Committee Member

Cris T. Clay

Abstract

This study assessed the effectiveness of an HIV/AIDS psychoeducational intervention and skills training package for a high-risk group for HIV/AIDS, the chronic mentally ill. Twenty-seven participants were randomly assigned to either a treatment or no treatment control group. Elements of the intervention were (a) education about HIV transmission and high risk groups, (b) problem-solving skills training, and (c) behavioral skills training based on education needs identified in a previous study of the same population. Pretest and posttest measures were administered to both the treatment and control groups in order to assess differences and improvement. Results showed improvements from pretest to posttest in the treatment group's HIV/AIDS knowledge, behavioral and role-play skills in high-risk situations, self-efficacy in utilizing learned skills, and intention to use these skills. The same improvement did not occur in the control group. Follow-up data and implications of the study are discussed.

Pages

79

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