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Date of Award

1995

Document Type

Dissertation - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Education

First Advisor

Dennis C. Brennan

First Committee Member

Judith Van Hoorn

Second Committee Member

Rita M. King

Third Committee Member

Lisa Ray

Fourth Committee Member

Mari G. Irvin

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine what relationship exists between the personality types of elementary school principals from a particular county in northern California and their perceived quality of shared decision-making programs in their schools. A relationship of certain types to greater success of programs could be a factor in determining fitness for promotion or placement to the position of elementary school principal. Twenty elementary school principals from this particular county were administered the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. A structured interview with each principal was also conducted to determine their perceptions of existing shared decision-making programs in their schools. Three research questions were considered concerning personality type and temperaments of the principals in three categories: those who perceived themselves as possessing a true shared decision-making model in their schools; those who perceived themselves as possessing some characteristics of shared decision-making in their schools; and those who perceived themselves as possessing no shared decision-making in their schools. Percentages of types were drawn and compared to percentages taken from a national data bank of elementary school principals personality types. Personality types and temperaments of the 20 principals differed considerably between the three different categories of shared decision-making status. Principals from the "no shared decision-making" group were found to be comprised of higher percentages of ESTJ types and SJ temperaments. Principals from the "true shared decision-making" group were found to be comprised of higher percentages of ENFJ types and NF temperaments. Principals from the "some shared decision-making" group were found to be comprised of a split between the ESFJ and ENFJ types. The NF temperament dominated the SJ temperament in this group. The elementary school principals under study compared similarly to the national samples of elementary school principals but were higher in the traits of Extroversion and Judging. Based on the findings of this study a number of recommendations were made for future studies and professional development.

Pages

115

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