Campus Access Only

All rights reserved. This publication is intended for use solely by faculty, students, and staff of University of the Pacific. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, now known or later developed, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author or the publisher.

Date of Award

2002

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

David Wilder

First Committee Member

Kenneth Beauchamp

Second Committee Member

Gary Howells

Abstract

The use of variable interval reinforcement and dependent group contingencies to increase the on-task behavior of students in general education classrooms was investigated. The study was conducted in general education third and fourth grade classrooms with 31 and 33 students, respectively. The intervention, which consisted of a classroom-wide program in which students could gain access to preferred items/activities contingent upon being on-task at random times that were unknown to them, was implemented when the students were working on mathematics. A multiple baseline design across classrooms was used to evaluate intervention effects. In addition, social validity measures were utilized to determine the extent to which the intervention was judged to be feasible for teachers to implement and acceptable to students.

Pages

50

To access this thesis/dissertation you must have a valid pacific.edu email address and log-in to Scholarly Commons.

Find in PacificSearch Find in ProQuest

Share

COinS

If you are the author and would like to grant permission to make your work openly accessible, please email