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Date of Award

1997

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Roseann Hannon

First Committee Member

Martin Gipson

Second Committee Member

Kenneth Beauchamp

Abstract

This project examined the possibility that changing belief structures about memory when teaching memory strategies would have a stronger impact on memory ability in the elderly (those over age 60) than teaching memory strategies alone. Twenty-six participants were randomly assigned to either a memory skills only group, or a memory skills combined with belief change group. A Memory Assessment Battery measured memory performance, and subscales of the Metamemory in Adulthood Questionnaire and the Memory Functioning Questionnaire examined memory self-efficacy beliefs, before and after the intervention. Results were examined via a 2 x 2 split-plot factorial ANOVA. Significant improvement in memory self-efficacy beliefs were found for the combined treatment group, but neither group showed significant improvement in memory performance.

Pages

128

ISBN

9780591548907 , 0591548909

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