Campus Access Only

All rights reserved. This publication is intended for use solely by faculty, students, and staff of University of the Pacific. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, now known or later developed, including but not limited to photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the author or the publisher.

Date of Award

2004

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Roseann Hannon

First Committee Member

David Wilder

Second Committee Member

Keven Schock

Abstract

Using a multiple baseline design, this study examined the effect of preferred items in increasing medication knowledge among individuals diagnosed with a mental illness. Participants were asked questions regarding their Haldol medication. After baseline, participants received the answers and a pharmacy-generated medication profile. During the Repeated Trials intervention, participants were given only verbal feedback. Those who had not reached criterion after 4 weeks entered the Preferred Trials intervention. In this phase, participants received a high, medium, or low preferred item contingent on the number of correct answers. All participants increased their number of correct answers. Although the effects of a contingent preferred item were mixed, this study showed that information regarding medications can be learned with minimal staff intervention.

Pages

36

To access this thesis/dissertation you must have a valid pacific.edu email address and log-in to Scholarly Commons.

Find in PacificSearch Find in ProQuest

Share

COinS

If you are the author and would like to grant permission to make your work openly accessible, please email