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Date of Award

1998

Document Type

Dissertation - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.)

Department

Educational Administration and Leadership

First Advisor

Dennis Brennan

First Committee Member

Harriett Arnold

Second Committee Member

Stephen Davis

Third Committee Member

Barbara Coulibaly

Fourth Committee Member

Mari Irvin

Abstract

This study gathered information on African American male high school students' perceptions of African American male vice principals as positive role models. Respondents were randomly selected African American male students in grades 10, 11, and 12 drawn from comprehensive high schools in the Oakland Unified School District, Oakland, California. To gather and analyze data for the study, two instruments were developed. One instrument was a questionnaire designed for African American male high school students. A second instrument was a questionnaire designed for African American male high school vice principals. In addition to the survey instruments, personal interviews were conducted with a small random sample of African American male students in an effort to gather more in-depth information than could be revealed in the survey instrument. Findings revealed that African American male students generally do not perceive African American male vice principals in their schools as role models. The primary reason given was African American males are most often cast in disciplinary roles and only “do the white man's work.” Despite this finding, African American male students feel a need for, and want, African American males vice principals in their schools. The study further revealed that these students have a strong desire to see African American male vice principals in roles other than disciplinary.

Pages

143

ISBN

9780599343047 , 0599343044

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