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Date of Award

1994

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Communication

First Advisor

Jon F. Schamber

First Committee Member

Randall J. Koper

Second Committee Member

Linda L. Nolan

Abstract

This study investigated the effect of communication competence, biological sex, and situation on compliance-gaining strategy choice. Two hypotheses and five research questions were addressed in this study. Specifically, hypothesis one predicted a positive correlation between communication competence and the likelihood of use ratings of pro-social compliance-gaining strategies. Hypothesis two predicted a negative correlation between communication competence and the likelihood of use ratings of anti-social compliance-gaining strategies. Four research questions examined differences in the likelihood of use ratings of pro- and anti-social compliance-gaining strategies according to situation (interpersonal and non-interpersonal) for male and females subjects. The last research question looked at differences in levels of communication competence for male and female subjects. Total sample size was 160, including 120 students from an introductory interpersonal communication course and 40 students from the adult, re-entry college. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to analyze the two hypotheses as it allowed for the comparison of the strength and direction of the relationship between variables. All research questions involved the comparison of mean scores and utilized a one way analysis of variance. Results showed no correlations between communication competence and the likelihood of use ratings of pro- and anti-social compliance-gaining strategies as was predicted in the two hypotheses. The data for research questions one and two showed no significant differences in the likelihood of use ratings of pro-social compliance-gaining strategies for male and female subjects regardless of situation. However, significant differences were found in the likelihood of use ratings of anti-social compliance-gaining strategies for male and female subjects. Specifically, males exhibited a greater likelihood of use ratings of anti-social compliance-gaining strategies regardless of situation. Finally, female subjects demonstrated higher levels of communication competence than males. Some of the differences which were found between male and female subjects may be a result of a pervasive socialization process, which in essence perpetuates stereotypical roles for both men and women. Because of this socialization process, men may, indeed, be less likely to distinguish the nuances between interpersonal and non-interpersonal situations. It is suggested that future research focus on similarities between males and females as opposed to differences.

Pages

86

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