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Date of Award

1969

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Speech

First Advisor

Halvor P. Hansen

First Committee Member

Jerald Nelson

Second Committee Member

Alberto Eraso-Guerro

Abstract

Language is the all-encompassing term used in many places and having various denotations. For this reason language has uses, too. Oral language is used as a principal factor to determine cultural disadvantage and is the primary medium of instruction in the school setting. Language operates as the intangible aspect in measurements of intelligence. The term 'language development' is used whenever one refers to the merits of federally funded preschool projects and is accepted without definition while the counter term 'linguistics' brings confusion in the mind of many classroom teachers and administrators. Commercial materials carry the label "linguistic method" or a "language development program" for a specific population. For educators 'language' is a loose, all powerful term which needs to be limited in meaning to a specific set of principles.

Pages

168

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