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Date of Award

1949

Document Type

Thesis - Pacific Access Restricted

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.)

Department

Graduate School

Abstract

The problem investigated in this thesis is the history of the Stilwell Road, from its beginning in 1920, as the old Burma Road, to its completion, re-naming, use in 1945, and death in 1946 .

The study of this problem justifies itself for various reasons, namely: (1) The Stilwell Road was severely needed by China as the only thoroughfare to the outside world. Chinese needs were of morale , equipment and arms- both large and small, and the training and advisory leadership of existing man-power.

China having stood alone against the Japanese since 1937 needed the psychological boost that was given by the Road--the thought that someone strong still stood at her side to see her through .

Without the Road, it would have been impossible to transport to China the large amounts of arms , equipment and supplies that found their way into the country. How well these supplies were used is a question for dispute, but it is known that with American supervision in distribution, the Chinese did receive some of the tools to put up a greater struggle to free themselves from the Japanese.

Pages

238

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