Title

A Look at Canary Mission: Democratic Theory through the Palestinian-American Eye

Lead Author Major

Political Science & International Relations

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dari Sylvester Tran

Faculty Mentor Department

Political Science

Abstract/Artist Statement

There have been many efforts made throughout history that aim to silence individuals who speak out against laws, governments, human rights violations, and other concepts of the sort. Modern day intimidation tactics take on a less physically violent form as they resort to public outings through social media and the internet. In this paper, I seek to hook this idea onto civil rights literature and policies in an attempt to understand the question of intimidation tactics. Further, I hypothesize that these intimidation tactics affect democratic participation. I take on this approach using ethnographic interviews with Palestinian-American college or university students to truly understand the Palestinian-American experience. I hypothesize that these tactics lead to self-censorship, which is subjective in many ways, but ultimately affects one’s perception of free speech and willingness to participate in America’s democracy.

Location

Yosemite Learning Lab, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Start Date

30-4-2022 2:20 PM

End Date

30-4-2022 2:39 PM

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Apr 30th, 2:20 PM Apr 30th, 2:39 PM

A Look at Canary Mission: Democratic Theory through the Palestinian-American Eye

Yosemite Learning Lab, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

There have been many efforts made throughout history that aim to silence individuals who speak out against laws, governments, human rights violations, and other concepts of the sort. Modern day intimidation tactics take on a less physically violent form as they resort to public outings through social media and the internet. In this paper, I seek to hook this idea onto civil rights literature and policies in an attempt to understand the question of intimidation tactics. Further, I hypothesize that these intimidation tactics affect democratic participation. I take on this approach using ethnographic interviews with Palestinian-American college or university students to truly understand the Palestinian-American experience. I hypothesize that these tactics lead to self-censorship, which is subjective in many ways, but ultimately affects one’s perception of free speech and willingness to participate in America’s democracy.