Title

Warming– but not herbicide exposure– alters resource acquisition and allocation in an insect

Poster Number

15B

Lead Author Major

Biological Science

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Biological Science

Format

Poster Presentation (Research Day, April 30)

Faculty Mentor Name

Zachary Stahlschmidt

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Glyphosate (GLY) is the most commonly used herbicide in the U.S. and in California. Although GLY has been marketed as non-toxic to animals, emerging research indicates that many animals may be adversely affected by GLY exposure. However, little work has been done on animals’ ability to detect GLY in drinking water sources, whether GLY consumption influences feeding behavior or reproductive investment, or if ongoing global warming influences dynamics among GLY consumption, drinking, feeding, and reproduction. Insects native to California (variable field crickets,Gryllus lineaticeps) were given one of two drinking treatments: tap water or Roundup(R) solution (5 mg GLY / L tap water). Crickets were also subjected to one of two temperature treatments: 28±10°C daily cycle (control; current field conditions) cycle or a 32±10°C daily cycle (predicted warming conditions). After 5 days of treatment, crickets’ consumption of water and food (dry cat food) were measured to determine resource acquisition. Then, crickets were weighed, euthanized, and dissected to measure dry ovary mass to determine allocation of resources to soma and reproduction. Warming increased feeding, and it promoted reproductive investment at expense to somatic investment. Drinking treatment did not affect any measured variable, including water and food consumption. Thus, crickets were unable to discern herbicide contamination in drinking water. Global environmental change has many facets, and our study indicates that one common feature of global change (warming) has greater effects on an insect than another common feature of global change (pesticide exposure).

Location

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Start Date

30-4-2022 1:00 PM

End Date

30-4-2022 3:00 PM

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Apr 30th, 1:00 PM Apr 30th, 3:00 PM

Warming– but not herbicide exposure– alters resource acquisition and allocation in an insect

Information Commons, William Knox Holt Memorial Library and Learning Center

Glyphosate (GLY) is the most commonly used herbicide in the U.S. and in California. Although GLY has been marketed as non-toxic to animals, emerging research indicates that many animals may be adversely affected by GLY exposure. However, little work has been done on animals’ ability to detect GLY in drinking water sources, whether GLY consumption influences feeding behavior or reproductive investment, or if ongoing global warming influences dynamics among GLY consumption, drinking, feeding, and reproduction. Insects native to California (variable field crickets,Gryllus lineaticeps) were given one of two drinking treatments: tap water or Roundup(R) solution (5 mg GLY / L tap water). Crickets were also subjected to one of two temperature treatments: 28±10°C daily cycle (control; current field conditions) cycle or a 32±10°C daily cycle (predicted warming conditions). After 5 days of treatment, crickets’ consumption of water and food (dry cat food) were measured to determine resource acquisition. Then, crickets were weighed, euthanized, and dissected to measure dry ovary mass to determine allocation of resources to soma and reproduction. Warming increased feeding, and it promoted reproductive investment at expense to somatic investment. Drinking treatment did not affect any measured variable, including water and food consumption. Thus, crickets were unable to discern herbicide contamination in drinking water. Global environmental change has many facets, and our study indicates that one common feature of global change (warming) has greater effects on an insect than another common feature of global change (pesticide exposure).