Title

Distal Colonoscope Attachment

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Bioengineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Bioengineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Bioengineering

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Fifth Author Major

Bioengineering

Fifth Author Status

5th year Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Jeff Burmeister

Faculty Mentor Department

BioEngineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women, and the number of deaths is expected to be 52,980 in 2021. Colonoscopy is currently the gold standard procedure for prevention of colorectal neoplasia by early detection and removal of precancerous colon polyps, or adenomas. However, during conventional colonoscopy (CC), nearly a fourth of smaller polyps are left undetected partly due to the complex configuration of the colon folds, or haustra, which limits direct visualization of these lesions. Thus, the objective is to design and test the efficacy of an add-on device mounted onto the distal end of the colonoscope which aims to improve the adenoma detection rate during the procedure. As the standardized quality of a colonoscopy is measured by this rate, it is crucial to maximize visualization by pushing back or stretching mucosal folds of the colon lining while simultaneously enhancing better control during colonoscopy for precise surgical operation. With consideration of patient comfort, safety, and effective material and structural design, the goal is to create a simple yet effective device that arguably prevents colon cancer by enhancing early detection and intervention. A real time porcine colon model designed for training purposes was utilized in a surgical operation setting comparing effectiveness of CC and the device created from 3D printing. During the operation, the insertion time and difficulty, number of polyps hidden behind folds, the successful ability to depress haustra safely, and the quality of scope stability during polyp resection with aid of the device, were observed and analyzed.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

1-5-2021 8:00 AM

End Date

1-5-2021 5:00 PM

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May 1st, 8:00 AM May 1st, 5:00 PM

Distal Colonoscope Attachment

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in both men and women, and the number of deaths is expected to be 52,980 in 2021. Colonoscopy is currently the gold standard procedure for prevention of colorectal neoplasia by early detection and removal of precancerous colon polyps, or adenomas. However, during conventional colonoscopy (CC), nearly a fourth of smaller polyps are left undetected partly due to the complex configuration of the colon folds, or haustra, which limits direct visualization of these lesions. Thus, the objective is to design and test the efficacy of an add-on device mounted onto the distal end of the colonoscope which aims to improve the adenoma detection rate during the procedure. As the standardized quality of a colonoscopy is measured by this rate, it is crucial to maximize visualization by pushing back or stretching mucosal folds of the colon lining while simultaneously enhancing better control during colonoscopy for precise surgical operation. With consideration of patient comfort, safety, and effective material and structural design, the goal is to create a simple yet effective device that arguably prevents colon cancer by enhancing early detection and intervention. A real time porcine colon model designed for training purposes was utilized in a surgical operation setting comparing effectiveness of CC and the device created from 3D printing. During the operation, the insertion time and difficulty, number of polyps hidden behind folds, the successful ability to depress haustra safely, and the quality of scope stability during polyp resection with aid of the device, were observed and analyzed.