Title

Students of Lower Socioeconomic Status Report Higher Stress and Lower Confidence During COVID-19 Remote Learning

Poster Number

2

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Carla Marie Strickland Hughes

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

University of the Pacific transitioned to remote learning as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This abrupt transition may have exacerbated pre-existing disparities that exist for underrepresented student minority groups (e.g., low-income, first-generation), such as lower confidence. Reduced opportunities for feedback, peer modeling, and hands-on practice, as well as increased stress, resulting from abrupt transitions to online learning might disrupt student self-efficacy (confidence in academic ability). Yet, student self-efficacy is key to academic success because of its relationships with motivation, goal-setting, and persistent effort in light of challenges. The present study examined the relationships between student self-efficacy and stress for students of varying socioeconomic status (SES) within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. University of the Pacific students (N=103; 78% female; 18-35 years old) were recruited via announcements to classes/organizations and word-of-mouth, and compensated with extra credit or gift card raffle entry. Participants completed a 15-minute anonymous online survey that assessed academic self-efficacy (Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire; alpha=.94), online learning self-efficacy (Online Learning Self Efficacy Scale; alpha=.94), COVID-19-related stress (COVID-19 Stress Scale; alpha=.92), general stress (Perceived Stress Scale; alpha=.89), state anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory; alpha=.92), subjective social status (MacArthur Ladder), and indicators of SES and other demographics. Statistical analyses included MANOVAs to compare student self-efficacy, stress, and anxiety across SES groups, and multiple linear regression models to test predictors of student self-efficacy. Overall, there were significant findings between SES and student self-efficacy, SES and stress, and significant predictors of academic self-efficacy. Specifically, there were group differences for online learning time management and COVID-19 economic stress. Additionally, worse grades in Fall 2020 semester (compared to typical grades) was related to lower academic self-efficacy and higher general stress.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 1:00 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 2:15 PM

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Apr 24th, 1:00 PM Apr 24th, 2:15 PM

Students of Lower Socioeconomic Status Report Higher Stress and Lower Confidence During COVID-19 Remote Learning

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

University of the Pacific transitioned to remote learning as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. This abrupt transition may have exacerbated pre-existing disparities that exist for underrepresented student minority groups (e.g., low-income, first-generation), such as lower confidence. Reduced opportunities for feedback, peer modeling, and hands-on practice, as well as increased stress, resulting from abrupt transitions to online learning might disrupt student self-efficacy (confidence in academic ability). Yet, student self-efficacy is key to academic success because of its relationships with motivation, goal-setting, and persistent effort in light of challenges. The present study examined the relationships between student self-efficacy and stress for students of varying socioeconomic status (SES) within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. University of the Pacific students (N=103; 78% female; 18-35 years old) were recruited via announcements to classes/organizations and word-of-mouth, and compensated with extra credit or gift card raffle entry. Participants completed a 15-minute anonymous online survey that assessed academic self-efficacy (Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire; alpha=.94), online learning self-efficacy (Online Learning Self Efficacy Scale; alpha=.94), COVID-19-related stress (COVID-19 Stress Scale; alpha=.92), general stress (Perceived Stress Scale; alpha=.89), state anxiety (State Trait Anxiety Inventory; alpha=.92), subjective social status (MacArthur Ladder), and indicators of SES and other demographics. Statistical analyses included MANOVAs to compare student self-efficacy, stress, and anxiety across SES groups, and multiple linear regression models to test predictors of student self-efficacy. Overall, there were significant findings between SES and student self-efficacy, SES and stress, and significant predictors of academic self-efficacy. Specifically, there were group differences for online learning time management and COVID-19 economic stress. Additionally, worse grades in Fall 2020 semester (compared to typical grades) was related to lower academic self-efficacy and higher general stress.