Title

Beyond Fiction: Animation, Society, and Theories of Reality

Lead Author Major

Media-X

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

N/A

Third Author Major

N/A

Fourth Author Major

N/A

Fifth Author Major

N/A

Sixth Author Major

N/A

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jeffrey Hole

Faculty Mentor Department

Department of English

Abstract/Artist Statement

“Beyond Fiction: Animation, Society, and Theories of Reality” seeks to study and analyze animation as a form that constitutes and mediates psychological and social realities. The project will look at how animation and the emergence of VR could lead to future questions of existence and the meaning of reality itself. The project draws from philosophical inquiries, such as the “Make-Move” theory from Jeff Malpas and Bruno Latour, as well as Actor-Network theory. Drawing from these theories and methodologies, this paper explores animation’s formal and technical components, analyzes the use of the medium in popular culture, and speculates into the future of the medium as it meshes with human society itself. I have divided my research presentation into three areas of inquiry: how animation has been constituted as a medium, how it has been utilized as a medium to affect society’s behavior (utilizing World War Two and the Coronavirus Pandemic as specific examples), and how modern advances in animation as a medium, such as virtual reality, lead to philosophical and ethical questions related to morality, immortality, and the meaning of life.

Location

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

Start Date

24-4-2021 4:45 PM

End Date

24-4-2021 5:00 PM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 24th, 4:45 PM Apr 24th, 5:00 PM

Beyond Fiction: Animation, Society, and Theories of Reality

University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Ave., Stockton, CA 95211

“Beyond Fiction: Animation, Society, and Theories of Reality” seeks to study and analyze animation as a form that constitutes and mediates psychological and social realities. The project will look at how animation and the emergence of VR could lead to future questions of existence and the meaning of reality itself. The project draws from philosophical inquiries, such as the “Make-Move” theory from Jeff Malpas and Bruno Latour, as well as Actor-Network theory. Drawing from these theories and methodologies, this paper explores animation’s formal and technical components, analyzes the use of the medium in popular culture, and speculates into the future of the medium as it meshes with human society itself. I have divided my research presentation into three areas of inquiry: how animation has been constituted as a medium, how it has been utilized as a medium to affect society’s behavior (utilizing World War Two and the Coronavirus Pandemic as specific examples), and how modern advances in animation as a medium, such as virtual reality, lead to philosophical and ethical questions related to morality, immortality, and the meaning of life.