Title

Transforming Timidness: Using BST to Teach Hand-Raising and Question-Asking to Shy Children

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Jessica Grady

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Delaney Callan

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Psychology

Additional Mentors

Graduate Student Mentor

Katherine Brock; k_brock3@u.pacific.edu ; Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

Shyness is a temperament trait associated with feelings of anxiety or fear in new social settings. When compared to their peers in school settings, shy children demonstrate lower rates of participation and overall engagement in classroom activities. This lack of engagement can prevent shy children from receiving the assistance they need to improve academic performance. While previous research has focused on teacher scaffolding, strategies to reduce shy children’s anxiety, and social skills training to elicit engagement, one method that the present project considers is behavioral skills training. The current study evaluates the effects of a behavioral skills training intervention on active engagement, specifically hand-raising and question-asking, in classroom activities.

Three 3.5-to-6-year-old children were examined using a multiple-baseline-across- participants design. Each child participated in a series of pre-assessments (i.e. shyness screening, math skills screening, ice breaker) in addition to the procedure (i.e. baseline, training, post-training). Observers recorded behavioral data on the frequency of hand-raising and question-asking.

At baseline, participants did not engage in the target behaviors. Upon implementation of the intervention, only one participant exhibited an increase in the rate of hand-raising and question-asking. Based on visual inspection of the data from the three participants, behavioral skills training may not be an adequate intervention to increase active engagement in the classroom. The presenter will share possible reasons as to why a lack of engagement was observed and potential implications for future research.

Location

Virtual

Start Date

25-4-2020 1:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2020 3:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 1:00 PM Apr 25th, 3:00 PM

Transforming Timidness: Using BST to Teach Hand-Raising and Question-Asking to Shy Children

Virtual

Shyness is a temperament trait associated with feelings of anxiety or fear in new social settings. When compared to their peers in school settings, shy children demonstrate lower rates of participation and overall engagement in classroom activities. This lack of engagement can prevent shy children from receiving the assistance they need to improve academic performance. While previous research has focused on teacher scaffolding, strategies to reduce shy children’s anxiety, and social skills training to elicit engagement, one method that the present project considers is behavioral skills training. The current study evaluates the effects of a behavioral skills training intervention on active engagement, specifically hand-raising and question-asking, in classroom activities.

Three 3.5-to-6-year-old children were examined using a multiple-baseline-across- participants design. Each child participated in a series of pre-assessments (i.e. shyness screening, math skills screening, ice breaker) in addition to the procedure (i.e. baseline, training, post-training). Observers recorded behavioral data on the frequency of hand-raising and question-asking.

At baseline, participants did not engage in the target behaviors. Upon implementation of the intervention, only one participant exhibited an increase in the rate of hand-raising and question-asking. Based on visual inspection of the data from the three participants, behavioral skills training may not be an adequate intervention to increase active engagement in the classroom. The presenter will share possible reasons as to why a lack of engagement was observed and potential implications for future research.