Title

What Makes Water Wet: Water Quality Node Network

Lead Author Major

Electrical Engineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Electrical Engineering

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Computer Engineering

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Engineering Physics

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Dr. Elizabeth Basha

Faculty Mentor Department

SOECS

Abstract/Artist Statement

Abstract:

Water quality is important, not only on an individual level, but also at an ecosystem level. Tracking data such as salinity and temperature in a spatial manner will allow our sponsor, and other researchers, to better grasp how these processes occur, providing a deeper understanding of the ecosystem as a whole.

The task is to automate data collection of these areas using a flexible system of floating nodes that can measure water quality through temperature and salinity measurements. The floating system will consist of phone-sized nodes that collect months of salinity and temperature data to map how a wetland is filtering water. The data collected is stored for later retrieval by the user.

While development of the device is still being completed, the results are quite promising. Additionally subsystem tests have collected accurate data that was stored and propagated correctly. Using this floating network system to take measurements will speed up data collection and be useful for environmental research. This handout provides a brief preview of the floating network system, technical specification, method of data collection, node communication, power design, and test result.

Artist Statement

Wetlands are a critical part of our natural environment. Monitoring these areas will give our sponsor long term spatial data over a long period of time with minimal interaction. The floating nodes will float on the surface like a boat and move around the water using a small, energy efficient motor. This will allow more area to be covered and ensure that the nodes are maximizing the space they cover. The sensors will be attached to the bottom of the nodes and placed in the water so they can collect the data. This data is then wirelessly to all other floating nodes in the water to ensure no data loss per individual nodes.

Location

Virtual

Start Date

25-4-2020 2:00 PM

End Date

25-4-2020 4:00 PM

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Apr 25th, 2:00 PM Apr 25th, 4:00 PM

What Makes Water Wet: Water Quality Node Network

Virtual

Abstract:

Water quality is important, not only on an individual level, but also at an ecosystem level. Tracking data such as salinity and temperature in a spatial manner will allow our sponsor, and other researchers, to better grasp how these processes occur, providing a deeper understanding of the ecosystem as a whole.

The task is to automate data collection of these areas using a flexible system of floating nodes that can measure water quality through temperature and salinity measurements. The floating system will consist of phone-sized nodes that collect months of salinity and temperature data to map how a wetland is filtering water. The data collected is stored for later retrieval by the user.

While development of the device is still being completed, the results are quite promising. Additionally subsystem tests have collected accurate data that was stored and propagated correctly. Using this floating network system to take measurements will speed up data collection and be useful for environmental research. This handout provides a brief preview of the floating network system, technical specification, method of data collection, node communication, power design, and test result.

Artist Statement

Wetlands are a critical part of our natural environment. Monitoring these areas will give our sponsor long term spatial data over a long period of time with minimal interaction. The floating nodes will float on the surface like a boat and move around the water using a small, energy efficient motor. This will allow more area to be covered and ensure that the nodes are maximizing the space they cover. The sensors will be attached to the bottom of the nodes and placed in the water so they can collect the data. This data is then wirelessly to all other floating nodes in the water to ensure no data loss per individual nodes.