Title

Gender Gap in Exercise Research in Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

Poster Number

07B

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Preeti Oza

Faculty Mentor Email

poza@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Physical Therapy

Abstract/Artist Statement

Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects approximately 10 million people worldwide. PD is a complex, progressive multisystem disease with a wide range of movement and cognitive impairments, activity limitations, and loss of independence. Research shows that exercise and physical activity help alleviate motor and non-motor symptoms. Men and women with PD experience different symptoms and have different challenges to healthcare access. It is unclear if exercise research has given due consideration to inclusion of women and compared/contrasted the effects of exercise protocols in men and women. A literature review was conducted to gather information about the representation of women and men in published exercise research. The review also aimed to gather the reported differences between men and women in responses to exercises. Peer-reviewed articles published in English language from PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, MEDLINE and PsychINFO were collected using search terms ‘physiotherapy’, ‘physical therapy’ and ‘physical exercise’ for ‘Parkinson’s disease’. After deleting the duplicate articles, gender inclusion was assessed from the methods section and gender differences from the results section. 71 articles met our selection articles. Of these 71 articles, only 4 articles reported gender information. Results will highlight the gender gap in research related to exercises in individuals with PD. This research project highlights the historically unmet research needs of women with PD, to elicit action in addressing these needs in future research and care. Consideration of differences between men and women with PD, to exercise effects and benefits will facilitate better-informed physical therapy and healthcare decisions.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Gender Gap in Exercise Research in Individuals with Parkinson’s Disease

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Parkinson’s disease (PD) affects approximately 10 million people worldwide. PD is a complex, progressive multisystem disease with a wide range of movement and cognitive impairments, activity limitations, and loss of independence. Research shows that exercise and physical activity help alleviate motor and non-motor symptoms. Men and women with PD experience different symptoms and have different challenges to healthcare access. It is unclear if exercise research has given due consideration to inclusion of women and compared/contrasted the effects of exercise protocols in men and women. A literature review was conducted to gather information about the representation of women and men in published exercise research. The review also aimed to gather the reported differences between men and women in responses to exercises. Peer-reviewed articles published in English language from PubMed, CINAHL, PEDro, MEDLINE and PsychINFO were collected using search terms ‘physiotherapy’, ‘physical therapy’ and ‘physical exercise’ for ‘Parkinson’s disease’. After deleting the duplicate articles, gender inclusion was assessed from the methods section and gender differences from the results section. 71 articles met our selection articles. Of these 71 articles, only 4 articles reported gender information. Results will highlight the gender gap in research related to exercises in individuals with PD. This research project highlights the historically unmet research needs of women with PD, to elicit action in addressing these needs in future research and care. Consideration of differences between men and women with PD, to exercise effects and benefits will facilitate better-informed physical therapy and healthcare decisions.