Title

Benefits of Behavior: Exercise Enhances Perception of Physical Function Independent of Improvement Among Diabetic Patients

Poster Number

07C

Lead Author Major

Psychology

Lead Author Status

Junior

Second Author Major

Health & Exercise Sciece

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

J. Mark VanNess

Faculty Mentor Email

mvanness@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Health, Exercise, and Sports Sciences

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Courtney D. Jensen

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

cjensen1@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Health, Exercise, and Sports Sciences

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Cynthia Villalobos

Graduate Student Mentor Email

c_villalobos1@u.pacific.edu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Health, Exercise, and Sports Sciences

Additional Mentors

Alexis C. King; aking1@pacific.edu; Graduate Assistant at University of Illinois Champaign Urbana

Paul D. Vosti; paul.vosti@dignityhealth.org; Wellness Coordinator at St. Joseph's Memorial Hospital

Abstract/Artist Statement

Patients with type II diabetes report lower quality of life (QOL) than those without chronic illness. Much of the literature focuses on the physical benefits of weight loss and blood glucose management rather than evaluation of psychological health, including patient perceptions. PURPOSE: To determine factors that affect perception of physical function in diabetic patients. METHODS: 38 men and women with diabetes completed a 10-week, 20-session exercise program that included both aerobic and resistance training components. At baseline and follow-up, body fat percent (BF%), body mass index (BMI), and performance was measured on six standard functional tests. Subjects completed a self-report QOL questionnaire in which perception of physical function was assessed. Linear regression tested the effect of functional performance (baseline capacity and 10-week change) on perception of function. RESULTS: Patients were 67.9±9.1 years of age, mean BMI was 31.5±6.1, and self-reported physical functioning ranged from 5.0 (very poor) to 100.0 (optimal); mean score was 54.7±26.8. At baseline, perception of physical functioning was not related to sex (P=0.751), age (P=0.405), BMI (P=0.610), or BF% (P=0.864). It was related to improved performances in six-minute walk (P<0.001), functional reach (P=0.046), timed up-and-go (P=0.080), chair stand (P=0.006), and sit-and-reach (P=0.024). At follow-up, perceptions of functioning improved by 13.8±24.5 points (25.7%; P=0.002) but there was no association with improvement in any anthropometric or functional tests: BMI (P=0.457), BF% (P=0.526), six-minute walk (P=0.131), functional reach (P=0.293), timed up-and-go (P=0.226), arm curl (P=0.966), chair stand (P=0.592), and sit-and-reach (P=0.970). CONCLUSION: 10 weeks of exercise improved perception of physical function by more than 25% in patients with diabetes. Improvement was unrelated to enhancement of any anthropometric or performance domain. Patients improved their perceptions via participation rather than progress. Thus, it may be important to incorporate the behavior of exercise into treatments, even if it fails to elicit physical improvement.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Benefits of Behavior: Exercise Enhances Perception of Physical Function Independent of Improvement Among Diabetic Patients

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Patients with type II diabetes report lower quality of life (QOL) than those without chronic illness. Much of the literature focuses on the physical benefits of weight loss and blood glucose management rather than evaluation of psychological health, including patient perceptions. PURPOSE: To determine factors that affect perception of physical function in diabetic patients. METHODS: 38 men and women with diabetes completed a 10-week, 20-session exercise program that included both aerobic and resistance training components. At baseline and follow-up, body fat percent (BF%), body mass index (BMI), and performance was measured on six standard functional tests. Subjects completed a self-report QOL questionnaire in which perception of physical function was assessed. Linear regression tested the effect of functional performance (baseline capacity and 10-week change) on perception of function. RESULTS: Patients were 67.9±9.1 years of age, mean BMI was 31.5±6.1, and self-reported physical functioning ranged from 5.0 (very poor) to 100.0 (optimal); mean score was 54.7±26.8. At baseline, perception of physical functioning was not related to sex (P=0.751), age (P=0.405), BMI (P=0.610), or BF% (P=0.864). It was related to improved performances in six-minute walk (P<0.001), functional reach (P=0.046), timed up-and-go (P=0.080), chair stand (P=0.006), and sit-and-reach (P=0.024). At follow-up, perceptions of functioning improved by 13.8±24.5 points (25.7%; P=0.002) but there was no association with improvement in any anthropometric or functional tests: BMI (P=0.457), BF% (P=0.526), six-minute walk (P=0.131), functional reach (P=0.293), timed up-and-go (P=0.226), arm curl (P=0.966), chair stand (P=0.592), and sit-and-reach (P=0.970). CONCLUSION: 10 weeks of exercise improved perception of physical function by more than 25% in patients with diabetes. Improvement was unrelated to enhancement of any anthropometric or performance domain. Patients improved their perceptions via participation rather than progress. Thus, it may be important to incorporate the behavior of exercise into treatments, even if it fails to elicit physical improvement.