Title

Widening the Playing Field: A Biomimetic Modeling System

Poster Number

08C

Lead Author Major

Mechanical Engineering

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Joshua Steimel

Faculty Mentor Email

jsteimel@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Mechanical Engineering

Abstract/Artist Statement

Friction is fundamental at the cellular level because it is at the core of many locomotion modes utilized by cells to navigate the complex and often crowded cellular environments. Understanding to what extent friction plays in biological processes like chemotaxis or haptotaxis is crucial. Typically, the first step in doing so is by simplifying the complex biological system and developing a synthetic model system to mimic the biological system of interest. To do this, an apparatus is needed to drive magnetic particle motion and to break bonds between the particle and the substrate. To accomplish this, one can utilize a Helmholtz coil type apparatus to generate rotating magnetic fields. Previous iterations of this apparatus were able to generate magnetic fields up to several mT, however this was not large enough to break strong biological interactions. Thus, an entirely new apparatus was built with larger magnetic coils to produce a higher magnetic field strength to break these bonds. By increasing the magnetic field strength, we will be able to measure a wider range of effective friction and frictional environments. The frame of the apparatus was constructed out of cut T-slots and secured together with 1-inch silver corner brackets. There were 350 turns of copper gauge 19 wire wrapped on each coil with inner and outer diameters of 4 and 5 inches. The previous iteration of this apparatus had only 150 turns per coil, which produced a magnetic flux density of 10 mT. A gaussmeter will be used on the new apparatus to measure the strength of its magnetic field. This will then be compared to the previous apparatus and the theoretical magnetic field strength of the new apparatus, which should be between 30-50mT. The homogeneity of the magnetic field will also be determined to prevent drift in future experiments.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Widening the Playing Field: A Biomimetic Modeling System

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Friction is fundamental at the cellular level because it is at the core of many locomotion modes utilized by cells to navigate the complex and often crowded cellular environments. Understanding to what extent friction plays in biological processes like chemotaxis or haptotaxis is crucial. Typically, the first step in doing so is by simplifying the complex biological system and developing a synthetic model system to mimic the biological system of interest. To do this, an apparatus is needed to drive magnetic particle motion and to break bonds between the particle and the substrate. To accomplish this, one can utilize a Helmholtz coil type apparatus to generate rotating magnetic fields. Previous iterations of this apparatus were able to generate magnetic fields up to several mT, however this was not large enough to break strong biological interactions. Thus, an entirely new apparatus was built with larger magnetic coils to produce a higher magnetic field strength to break these bonds. By increasing the magnetic field strength, we will be able to measure a wider range of effective friction and frictional environments. The frame of the apparatus was constructed out of cut T-slots and secured together with 1-inch silver corner brackets. There were 350 turns of copper gauge 19 wire wrapped on each coil with inner and outer diameters of 4 and 5 inches. The previous iteration of this apparatus had only 150 turns per coil, which produced a magnetic flux density of 10 mT. A gaussmeter will be used on the new apparatus to measure the strength of its magnetic field. This will then be compared to the previous apparatus and the theoretical magnetic field strength of the new apparatus, which should be between 30-50mT. The homogeneity of the magnetic field will also be determined to prevent drift in future experiments.