Title

The Curse of Eve: 700 Years of Traditional Misogyny Represented in Roman de Silence

Lead Author Major

English

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Andreea Boboc

Faculty Mentor Email

aboboc@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

English

Abstract/Artist Statement

The concept that duplicity comes naturally to women has made an unfortunate resurgence in recent years. Heldris de Cornuälle’s Roman de Silence addresses this assertion as early as the 13th century: the romance uses the virtues and complex identity of its heroine to covertly challenge the traditional notion of womens’ natural deceitfulness. Between the debates of allegorical characters Nature and Nurture and the foil characters of a willful, lustful queen and a demure countess, the romance employs the adventures an escapist character to argue that while women are often not credited for it, they are capable of achieving the same level of excellence as the best of men. My paper will seek to explore the narrative in light of the misogynistic tradition most prevalent at the time, in order to highlight the revolutionary and empowering nature of the title character, as well as discuss how this tradition has evolved within our own culture.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

27-4-2018 10:20 AM

End Date

27-4-2018 10:39 AM

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Apr 27th, 10:20 AM Apr 27th, 10:39 AM

The Curse of Eve: 700 Years of Traditional Misogyny Represented in Roman de Silence

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

The concept that duplicity comes naturally to women has made an unfortunate resurgence in recent years. Heldris de Cornuälle’s Roman de Silence addresses this assertion as early as the 13th century: the romance uses the virtues and complex identity of its heroine to covertly challenge the traditional notion of womens’ natural deceitfulness. Between the debates of allegorical characters Nature and Nurture and the foil characters of a willful, lustful queen and a demure countess, the romance employs the adventures an escapist character to argue that while women are often not credited for it, they are capable of achieving the same level of excellence as the best of men. My paper will seek to explore the narrative in light of the misogynistic tradition most prevalent at the time, in order to highlight the revolutionary and empowering nature of the title character, as well as discuss how this tradition has evolved within our own culture.