Title

Investigation on how students do their homework and knowledge retention

Poster Number

10B

Lead Author Major

Bioengineering

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Binod Nainabasti

Faculty Mentor Email

bnainabasti@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Physics

Abstract/Artist Statement

Homework, midterms, and finals are commonly used in the everyday classroom to educate and test students. However, the efficacy of these methods to enforce knowledge retention are not clearly proven. The primary goal of this study was to investigate how students do their homework problems and how their ways of doing homework problems affect their performance in the class. This study was conducted on homework and exam problems assigned in introductory physics classes at two different academic institutions, University of the Pacific and Oregon Institute of Technology. We characterize students’ effort on doing homework in terms of consistencies of force diagrams with corresponding mathematical representations used in solving physics problems. We checked the connection between pictorial diagrams with equivalent mathematical equations and how these play a role in their knowledge retention. Preliminary findings indicate students who made mistakes on either the homework or midterm are able to gain more points on the final. These early findings suggest student knowledge retention occurs more effectively when students make mistakes early in the learning process.

Location

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Start Date

27-4-2018 12:30 PM

End Date

27-4-2018 2:30 PM

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Apr 27th, 12:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Investigation on how students do their homework and knowledge retention

DeRosa University Center Ballroom

Homework, midterms, and finals are commonly used in the everyday classroom to educate and test students. However, the efficacy of these methods to enforce knowledge retention are not clearly proven. The primary goal of this study was to investigate how students do their homework problems and how their ways of doing homework problems affect their performance in the class. This study was conducted on homework and exam problems assigned in introductory physics classes at two different academic institutions, University of the Pacific and Oregon Institute of Technology. We characterize students’ effort on doing homework in terms of consistencies of force diagrams with corresponding mathematical representations used in solving physics problems. We checked the connection between pictorial diagrams with equivalent mathematical equations and how these play a role in their knowledge retention. Preliminary findings indicate students who made mistakes on either the homework or midterm are able to gain more points on the final. These early findings suggest student knowledge retention occurs more effectively when students make mistakes early in the learning process.