Title

Intersectionality and the pathways to incarceration

Lead Author Major

Sociology

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Sociology

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Sociology

Third Author Status

Senior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Marcia Hernandez

Faculty Mentor Email

mhernandez@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Sociology

Abstract/Artist Statement

The goal of our senior project is to study using an intersectional lens how race, class, gender, and domestic violence influence the incarceration of African American women. We are motivated to do this study as African American women, and we see the disparities and the inequalities in our everyday life. With the current news headlines of African American women going to prison in high rates, and historical knowledge that this country was built on the marginalization of black people. Our study addresses ongoing, historical disparities. We explore layers of injustice that African American women experience, such as lack of legal protection in the criminal system in American, and how the court system undermine the protection of women against abuse or domestic violence.

We intend to use an intersectional lens to understand the violence and the pathways that lead women, specifically African Americans into the criminal justice system. We also studied the identifying patterns dealing with race, class, gender, and violence, and if any biases within the criminal justice system exist. To conduct our research, we used academic sources, such as books, peer-reviewed, scholarly journal articles, as well as web sources. We specifically used sources that highlight disparities finding within the criminal justice system when addressing race, class, gender, and violence, in addition, we also offer sociological explanations for those disparities. While conducting our research, we were able to pinpoint the biases that exist in the criminal justice system that have created these disparate practices. We will further discuss solutions to eliminate disparities, making the treatment of women in criminal justice system equal across racial groups and class.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

28-4-2018 3:00 PM

End Date

28-4-2018 3:20 PM

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Apr 28th, 3:00 PM Apr 28th, 3:20 PM

Intersectionality and the pathways to incarceration

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

The goal of our senior project is to study using an intersectional lens how race, class, gender, and domestic violence influence the incarceration of African American women. We are motivated to do this study as African American women, and we see the disparities and the inequalities in our everyday life. With the current news headlines of African American women going to prison in high rates, and historical knowledge that this country was built on the marginalization of black people. Our study addresses ongoing, historical disparities. We explore layers of injustice that African American women experience, such as lack of legal protection in the criminal system in American, and how the court system undermine the protection of women against abuse or domestic violence.

We intend to use an intersectional lens to understand the violence and the pathways that lead women, specifically African Americans into the criminal justice system. We also studied the identifying patterns dealing with race, class, gender, and violence, and if any biases within the criminal justice system exist. To conduct our research, we used academic sources, such as books, peer-reviewed, scholarly journal articles, as well as web sources. We specifically used sources that highlight disparities finding within the criminal justice system when addressing race, class, gender, and violence, in addition, we also offer sociological explanations for those disparities. While conducting our research, we were able to pinpoint the biases that exist in the criminal justice system that have created these disparate practices. We will further discuss solutions to eliminate disparities, making the treatment of women in criminal justice system equal across racial groups and class.