Title

Testing for cryptic species within Adelpha basiloides (H. W. Bates, 1865)

Poster Number

10C

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Second Author Major

Biolgical Sciences

Second Author Status

Junior

Third Author Major

Geological and Environmental Sciences

Third Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Ryan Hill

Faculty Mentor Email

rhill@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Insects are essential inhabitants of our planet. They are critical for nutrient cycling, maintenance of diversity in both plant and animal communities, as well as important for food crop pollination, development of medicines, and controlling pests. Although insects are numerous and beneficial to life on Earth, they are slowly losing ground due to human inconsideration. Insects are currently facing habitat destruction and unintended death by pesticides from agriculture. Tropical environments exhibit diverse habitats contributing to the diversity and richness of insects. Butterflies are arguably the most well studied insects and as such serve as excellent models in studies to understand patterns and processes of biological diversity. However, destructive behaviors such as deforestation are putting these diverse habitats and our ability to understand them at risk. At the pinnacle of tropical butterfly diversity, the genus Adelpha is the most diverse with ~90 described species. However, additional diversity remains to be documented and described. For example, Adelpha basiloides is an abundant species that may contain another taxon distinct enough to be called a new species. Two genetic clusters based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found in Costa Rica. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that these two clusters each represent a different species. To do this, we used a ~650 base pair region of the gene Cytochrome oxidase subunit I (i.e. the DNA barcode) along with morphological and ecological data. We analyzed mtDNA sequences of A. basiloides individuals using Neighbor-Joining trees, and maximum intraspecific distances and minimum interspecific distances were used to test for presence of a “barcoding gap”. In addition, adult wing pattern traits and host plant records were analyzed to test whether the mtDNA clusters represent ecologically relevant cryptic species.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Testing for cryptic species within Adelpha basiloides (H. W. Bates, 1865)

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Insects are essential inhabitants of our planet. They are critical for nutrient cycling, maintenance of diversity in both plant and animal communities, as well as important for food crop pollination, development of medicines, and controlling pests. Although insects are numerous and beneficial to life on Earth, they are slowly losing ground due to human inconsideration. Insects are currently facing habitat destruction and unintended death by pesticides from agriculture. Tropical environments exhibit diverse habitats contributing to the diversity and richness of insects. Butterflies are arguably the most well studied insects and as such serve as excellent models in studies to understand patterns and processes of biological diversity. However, destructive behaviors such as deforestation are putting these diverse habitats and our ability to understand them at risk. At the pinnacle of tropical butterfly diversity, the genus Adelpha is the most diverse with ~90 described species. However, additional diversity remains to be documented and described. For example, Adelpha basiloides is an abundant species that may contain another taxon distinct enough to be called a new species. Two genetic clusters based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) have been found in Costa Rica. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that these two clusters each represent a different species. To do this, we used a ~650 base pair region of the gene Cytochrome oxidase subunit I (i.e. the DNA barcode) along with morphological and ecological data. We analyzed mtDNA sequences of A. basiloides individuals using Neighbor-Joining trees, and maximum intraspecific distances and minimum interspecific distances were used to test for presence of a “barcoding gap”. In addition, adult wing pattern traits and host plant records were analyzed to test whether the mtDNA clusters represent ecologically relevant cryptic species.