Title

Purification of Dragline Silk Proteins to Explore Effects of Silk Components on Wound Healing

Poster Number

03B

Lead Author Major

Biological Sciences

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Biological Sciences

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Biological Sciences

Third Author Status

Senior

Fourth Author Major

Biological Sciences

Fourth Author Status

Senior

Fifth Author Major

Biological Sciences

Fifth Author Status

Junior

Sixth Author Major

Biological Sciences

Sixth Author Status

Junior

Additional Authors

7. Soyeon Shim

Biology

Senior

8. Ivy Hang

Biology

Junior

9. Ike Kwon

Biology

Senior

10. Hayoung Kim

Biology

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Craig Vierra

Faculty Mentor Email

c_vierra@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract/Artist Statement

Dragline silk has become a focus of the scientific community due to its high tensile strength, extensibility, and toughness. Silk has many applications to the real world, including incorporation into shoes, tires, body armor, and music instruments. Interestingly, cobweb silk has been reported in ancient history to play a significant role in wound-healing. One of the main fiber types in cobwebs is dragline silk, suggesting components of dragline silk drive the wound healing process. To explore the effects of proteins found in dragline silk and their association with wound healing, we designed an experiment to test one of the newly discovered dragline silk protein, cysteine-rich protein 1 (CRP1), and its potential linkage to wound healing. To investigate whether CRP1 can influence wound healing, we expressed Sumo-CRP1 in bacteria and purified the fusion protein using affinity chromatography. Affinity purified Sumo-CRP1 proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis and silver staining as well as in solution tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. Our long-term goal is to treat human immune system cells with CRP1 to investigate whether it plays a role in wound healing.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

28-4-2018 10:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2018 12:00 PM

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Apr 28th, 10:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:00 PM

Purification of Dragline Silk Proteins to Explore Effects of Silk Components on Wound Healing

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Dragline silk has become a focus of the scientific community due to its high tensile strength, extensibility, and toughness. Silk has many applications to the real world, including incorporation into shoes, tires, body armor, and music instruments. Interestingly, cobweb silk has been reported in ancient history to play a significant role in wound-healing. One of the main fiber types in cobwebs is dragline silk, suggesting components of dragline silk drive the wound healing process. To explore the effects of proteins found in dragline silk and their association with wound healing, we designed an experiment to test one of the newly discovered dragline silk protein, cysteine-rich protein 1 (CRP1), and its potential linkage to wound healing. To investigate whether CRP1 can influence wound healing, we expressed Sumo-CRP1 in bacteria and purified the fusion protein using affinity chromatography. Affinity purified Sumo-CRP1 proteins were confirmed by SDS-PAGE analysis and silver staining as well as in solution tryptic digestion and mass spectrometry. Our long-term goal is to treat human immune system cells with CRP1 to investigate whether it plays a role in wound healing.