Title

Sign Stealer

Lead Author Major

Computer Science con. Software Development

Lead Author Status

Senior

Format

SOECS Senior Project Demonstration

Faculty Mentor Name

Shon Vick

Faculty Mentor Email

svick@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Computer Science Department

Abstract/Artist Statement

In the game of baseball and softball “signs” are a communication method that players and coaches use to coordinate plays independently from the opposing team. This is done through a series of gestures presented by a coach or a player that correlate to a specific pitch, positioning, or play. Commonly, a coach will tap numerous areas of his or her face and body in sequence in order to give a sign. A coach will include decoy signs in addition to the actual sign that corresponds to a play in order to avoid detection from the opposing team. If a team is able to decode their opponent’s signs, they will have a competitive advantage and greatly increase their chances of winning the game.

Sign Stealer is an application built for iOS devices that allows users to input an opposing teams sign gestures and the corresponding result. The application uses pattern recognition techniques to analyze the sign sequence data in order to find consistencies and seperate the signs that correspond to a play from the decoy signs. Since a specific sign gesture is often given rapidly and only once, users can customize specific input related settings in order to ensure accuracy and promptness when logging sign sequence data and results.

On Senior Project day, attendees can expect to see a demonstration of Sign Stealer and attempt to steal the set of signs currently used by the University of the Pacific Baseball team.

Location

School of Engineering & Computer Science

Start Date

5-5-2018 3:30 PM

End Date

5-5-2018 4:30 PM

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May 5th, 3:30 PM May 5th, 4:30 PM

Sign Stealer

School of Engineering & Computer Science

In the game of baseball and softball “signs” are a communication method that players and coaches use to coordinate plays independently from the opposing team. This is done through a series of gestures presented by a coach or a player that correlate to a specific pitch, positioning, or play. Commonly, a coach will tap numerous areas of his or her face and body in sequence in order to give a sign. A coach will include decoy signs in addition to the actual sign that corresponds to a play in order to avoid detection from the opposing team. If a team is able to decode their opponent’s signs, they will have a competitive advantage and greatly increase their chances of winning the game.

Sign Stealer is an application built for iOS devices that allows users to input an opposing teams sign gestures and the corresponding result. The application uses pattern recognition techniques to analyze the sign sequence data in order to find consistencies and seperate the signs that correspond to a play from the decoy signs. Since a specific sign gesture is often given rapidly and only once, users can customize specific input related settings in order to ensure accuracy and promptness when logging sign sequence data and results.

On Senior Project day, attendees can expect to see a demonstration of Sign Stealer and attempt to steal the set of signs currently used by the University of the Pacific Baseball team.