Title

Sappho: Examined and Applied

Lead Author Major

Music, B.A.

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Oral Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Camille Norton

Faculty Mentor Email

cnorton@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

English

Additional Faculty Mentor Name

Sarah Waltz

Additional Faculty Mentor Email

swaltz@pacific.edu

Additional Faculty Mentor Department

Music History

Abstract/Artist Statement

The author has engaged in the close study of several translations of the poetry and fragments of the poet Sappho – as well as commentaries and work by later writers considering Sappho’s poetry — to understand the content, lyrical style, and meter/rhythm of her work. Further, the author has examined the work of contemporary musicologists and music historians on the characterization of women in opera –both in music and text—as well as the construction, timbre, and range of ancient instruments and the extent of current knowledge on how ancient music would have sounded. Using these studies as a basis, the author will be applying this to the text of a libretto and score for an opera on the subject of Eurydice and Orpheus. At this point, the author has outlined the full libretto of the opera, written full texts of a handful of musical numbers, and composed musical excerpts from the first act that exemplify the principles that she has developed as a product of her studies.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

Start Date

29-4-2017 2:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2017 2:20 PM

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Apr 29th, 2:00 PM Apr 29th, 2:20 PM

Sappho: Examined and Applied

DeRosa University Center, Room 211

The author has engaged in the close study of several translations of the poetry and fragments of the poet Sappho – as well as commentaries and work by later writers considering Sappho’s poetry — to understand the content, lyrical style, and meter/rhythm of her work. Further, the author has examined the work of contemporary musicologists and music historians on the characterization of women in opera –both in music and text—as well as the construction, timbre, and range of ancient instruments and the extent of current knowledge on how ancient music would have sounded. Using these studies as a basis, the author will be applying this to the text of a libretto and score for an opera on the subject of Eurydice and Orpheus. At this point, the author has outlined the full libretto of the opera, written full texts of a handful of musical numbers, and composed musical excerpts from the first act that exemplify the principles that she has developed as a product of her studies.