Title

Inactivation of Disease-Causing Nonresistant and Antibiotic-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis Strains by Food-Compatible Plant Extracts

Poster Number

07B

Lead Author Major

Pre-pharmacy 3+3; Biochemistry

Lead Author Status

Senior

Second Author Major

Pre-dentistry 3+3; Biology

Second Author Status

Senior

Third Author Major

Pre-pharmacy 3+3; Biology

Third Author Status

Senior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Kirkwood Land

Faculty Mentor Email

kland@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Biological Sciences

Additional Mentors

Dr.Mendel Friedman, Healthy Processed Foods Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, United States Department of Agriculture, Albany, CA 94710. E-mail: mendel.friedman@ars.usda.gov; Tel: +1-510-559-5615

Abstract/Artist Statement

Plants produce bioactive organic compounds known as secondary metabolites that possess numerous health benefits, including antibiotic properties. One mechanism by which such compounds operate at the cellular level involves interaction with and disruption of cell membranes. The main of objective of the present study was to determine the potential of the following plant formulations, known to inhibit pathogenic foodborne bacteria and viruses to inhibit the growth of (inactivate) nonresistant and antibiotic-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis protozoa strains that cause venereal diseases in animals and humans: black tea extracts with a low and high theaflavin content; grape fruit and grape seed extracts; green tea extracts; jujube fruit and seed extracts; and pomegranate fruit and seed extracts. The results show that (a) the black theaflavin-rich (80%) extract strongly inhibited the growth of both nonresistant strains and a clinical strain that is resistant to metronidazole, a drug widely used to treat human infections; (b) the theaflavin-poor (20%) black tea extract was less effective; (c) the green tea and pomegranate extracts showed intermediate activity; and (d) the other formulations exhibited low or no activity under the test conditions. The results suggest that the black tea, green tea, and pomegranate extracts might be possible natural alternative therapeutic agents to treat Trichomonas vaginalis and the related Tritrichomonas foetus in humans, cats, and food-producing animals and cats.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2017 3:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 3:00 PM

Inactivation of Disease-Causing Nonresistant and Antibiotic-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis Strains by Food-Compatible Plant Extracts

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Plants produce bioactive organic compounds known as secondary metabolites that possess numerous health benefits, including antibiotic properties. One mechanism by which such compounds operate at the cellular level involves interaction with and disruption of cell membranes. The main of objective of the present study was to determine the potential of the following plant formulations, known to inhibit pathogenic foodborne bacteria and viruses to inhibit the growth of (inactivate) nonresistant and antibiotic-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis protozoa strains that cause venereal diseases in animals and humans: black tea extracts with a low and high theaflavin content; grape fruit and grape seed extracts; green tea extracts; jujube fruit and seed extracts; and pomegranate fruit and seed extracts. The results show that (a) the black theaflavin-rich (80%) extract strongly inhibited the growth of both nonresistant strains and a clinical strain that is resistant to metronidazole, a drug widely used to treat human infections; (b) the theaflavin-poor (20%) black tea extract was less effective; (c) the green tea and pomegranate extracts showed intermediate activity; and (d) the other formulations exhibited low or no activity under the test conditions. The results suggest that the black tea, green tea, and pomegranate extracts might be possible natural alternative therapeutic agents to treat Trichomonas vaginalis and the related Tritrichomonas foetus in humans, cats, and food-producing animals and cats.