Title

Gender Stereotypes in Drug Choices

Poster Number

21A

Lead Author Major

Brittany Rogers

Lead Author Status

Sophomore

Second Author Major

Alondra Soto

Second Author Status

Sophomore

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Zsolt Palatinus

Faculty Mentor Email

zpalatinus@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Psychology

Graduate Student Mentor Name

Amanda Brown

Graduate Student Mentor Email

a_brown33@u.pacific.edu

Graduate Student Mentor Department

Psychology

Abstract/Artist Statement

This study examines the existence of stereotypes among college students regarding which drugs students associate more with which gender. A previous study conducted by Kennedy, Epstein, Phillips, and Preston (2013) has shown that females are more likely to consume cocaine when shown it then men and felt more remorse after using the drug. For our study, we identified twelve of the most common drugs present in American society as, marijuana, cocaine, amphetamine, ecstasy, LSD, alcohol, prescription medications, poopers, magic mushrooms, and heroine. Participants were asked to fill out an online survey regarding their beliefs revolving around gender specific drug choices. After a series of demographic questions, participants were asked to mark which substances they associated with each gender and who partook in the abuse of the substance at a higher rate. The last aspect of the study presented the participant with a series of two images, one male and one female of the same race, and a quote from one regarding their drug habit, then asked to identify which person pictured is more likely to have made that statement. Data collection is ongoing and will be presented visually via poster.

Keywords: Gender, stereotypes, drug choices

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 10:00 AM

End Date

29-4-2017 12:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 10:00 AM Apr 29th, 12:00 PM

Gender Stereotypes in Drug Choices

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

This study examines the existence of stereotypes among college students regarding which drugs students associate more with which gender. A previous study conducted by Kennedy, Epstein, Phillips, and Preston (2013) has shown that females are more likely to consume cocaine when shown it then men and felt more remorse after using the drug. For our study, we identified twelve of the most common drugs present in American society as, marijuana, cocaine, amphetamine, ecstasy, LSD, alcohol, prescription medications, poopers, magic mushrooms, and heroine. Participants were asked to fill out an online survey regarding their beliefs revolving around gender specific drug choices. After a series of demographic questions, participants were asked to mark which substances they associated with each gender and who partook in the abuse of the substance at a higher rate. The last aspect of the study presented the participant with a series of two images, one male and one female of the same race, and a quote from one regarding their drug habit, then asked to identify which person pictured is more likely to have made that statement. Data collection is ongoing and will be presented visually via poster.

Keywords: Gender, stereotypes, drug choices