Title

The Effects of Music-Based Interventions on the Relationship between Persons with Dementia and their Caregivers

Poster Number

18A

Lead Author Major

Music Therapy

Lead Author Status

Junior

Format

Poster Presentation

Faculty Mentor Name

Fei-Lin Hsiao, Ph.D., MT-BC

Faculty Mentor Email

fhsiao@pacific.edu

Faculty Mentor Department

Music Therapy

Abstract/Artist Statement

Dementia is neurocognitive disorder that compromises memory, motor, communication, and social functioning. According to Alzheimer’s Association (2017), there is an estimated 5 million people living with Alzheimer’s or other dementia. Music therapy is a non-pharmacological treatment method that helps persons with dementia in areas such as disruptive behaviors, anxiety levels, depressive moods, social interaction, and quality of life. Effective music-based interventions include singing, music and movement, and instrumental improvisation. Significant improvement has been found in dementia caregiving dyads concerning the engagement between caregivers and their care recipients and quality of life. Training for professional caregivers on music therapy techniques such as singing or humming as an alternative ways of communication help produce a sense of connection between themselves and the persons with dementia. To date, however, few studies have examined the effects of music-based interventions on persons with dementia and their family caregivers. Although preliminary evidence has identified positive indicators of caregiving dyads’ overall well-being, more studies are needed to establish the approach as an evidence-based intervention. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate how music-based interventions foster the relationship of the caregivers and persons with dementia. Caregiver–care recipient dyads from senior-care facilities were recruited to participate in a six-week program involving four forms of music-based interventions: singing and humming, gentle movement, instrument playing, and receptive listening. Procedures included a pre-treatment intake, an assessment, caregiver training, implementation, post-treatment, and a six-week follow-up evaluations. Preliminary results from the Dyadic Relationship Scale and the Revised Caregiving Satisfaction Scale indicated positive changes from pre and post treatment. The findings of the study contribute to the clinical care of persons with dementia, particularly for improving meaningful relationships with their family caregivers.

Location

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Start Date

29-4-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

29-4-2017 3:00 PM

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Apr 29th, 1:00 PM Apr 29th, 3:00 PM

The Effects of Music-Based Interventions on the Relationship between Persons with Dementia and their Caregivers

DeRosa University Center, Ballroom

Dementia is neurocognitive disorder that compromises memory, motor, communication, and social functioning. According to Alzheimer’s Association (2017), there is an estimated 5 million people living with Alzheimer’s or other dementia. Music therapy is a non-pharmacological treatment method that helps persons with dementia in areas such as disruptive behaviors, anxiety levels, depressive moods, social interaction, and quality of life. Effective music-based interventions include singing, music and movement, and instrumental improvisation. Significant improvement has been found in dementia caregiving dyads concerning the engagement between caregivers and their care recipients and quality of life. Training for professional caregivers on music therapy techniques such as singing or humming as an alternative ways of communication help produce a sense of connection between themselves and the persons with dementia. To date, however, few studies have examined the effects of music-based interventions on persons with dementia and their family caregivers. Although preliminary evidence has identified positive indicators of caregiving dyads’ overall well-being, more studies are needed to establish the approach as an evidence-based intervention. Thus, the purpose of this study is to investigate how music-based interventions foster the relationship of the caregivers and persons with dementia. Caregiver–care recipient dyads from senior-care facilities were recruited to participate in a six-week program involving four forms of music-based interventions: singing and humming, gentle movement, instrument playing, and receptive listening. Procedures included a pre-treatment intake, an assessment, caregiver training, implementation, post-treatment, and a six-week follow-up evaluations. Preliminary results from the Dyadic Relationship Scale and the Revised Caregiving Satisfaction Scale indicated positive changes from pre and post treatment. The findings of the study contribute to the clinical care of persons with dementia, particularly for improving meaningful relationships with their family caregivers.